The Grammar of Ornament: A Visual Reference of Form and Colour in Architecture and the Decorative Arts - The Complete and Unabridged Full-Color

Owen Jones (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$45.00  $41.40
Publisher
Princeton University Press
Publish Date
July 26, 2016
Pages
496
Dimensions
8.1 X 1.6 X 9.3 inches | 4.0 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780691172064

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About the Author

Owen Jones (1809-74) was an English-born Welsh architect and one of the most important design theorists of the nineteenth century. He taught applied arts at the South Kensington School of Design in the 1850s and served as Superintendent of Works at the Great Exhibition of 1851. He was a key figure in the founding of the South Kensington Museum, which later became the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Reviews

"Wonderful. This reissue of Owen Jones's Grammar of Ornament, unabridged and in full color, will be welcomed by scholars as well as architects and desginers."--Alina Payne, author of From Ornament to Object: Genealogies of Architectural Modernism
"Like the Crystal Palace, for which Jones himself designed the interior color scheme, this book is a riotous cornicopia of hue and form, a heroic attempt to come to grips with the entire world of things. The Grammar of Ornament is an object of beauty in its own right"--Tim Barringer, author of Reading the Pre-Raphaelites
"Architects, design nerds and hard-core antiquarians may be the natural audience for the reissue of this Victorian-era classic. But if you have wondered--as I have--about the subtle differences between the filigrees featured in Persian, Byzantine and Arabian tilework, The Grammar of Ornament: A Visual Reference of Form and Colour in Architecture and the Decorative Arts (Princeton University Press) is a good book to have on hand. . . . The illustrations are delightful, and perhaps surprisingly, it is easy to pick a page at random and find a bit of tasty decorative information to digest. Summer grazing at its best."---Ted Loos, Introspective Magazine