The Gospel in Gerard Manley Hopkins: Selections from His Poems, Letters, Journals, and Spiritual Writings

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Product Details

Price
$18.00  $16.74
Publisher
Plough Publishing House
Publish Date
Pages
268
Dimensions
8.2 X 5.4 X 0.7 inches | 0.8 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780874868227

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About the Author

One of the great Christian poets of the modern era, Gerard Manley Hopkins was born in Stratford, England in 1844. At age twenty-two he left a promising career at Oxford to become a Jesuit priest. When he died of typhoid fever in 1899 at age forty-four, none of his poems had been published.
Margaret Ellsberg (PhD, Harvard University) teaches English at Barnard College. She is the author of Created to Praise: The Language of Gerard Manley Hopkins (Oxford Univeristy Press, 1987) and The Gospel in Gerard Manley Hopkins: With Selections from His Poems, Letters, Journals, and Spiritual Writings (Plough, 2017)

Dana Gioia is an internationally acclaimed and award-winning poet. Former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, Gioia is a native Californian of Italian and Mexican descent. He received a B.A. and a M.B.A. from Stanford University and an M.A. in Comparative Literature from Harvard University. Gioia currently serves as the Poet Laureate of California.

Gioia has published five full-length collections of poetry, most recently 99 Poems: New & Selected. His poetry collection, Interrogations at Noon, won the 2002 American Book Award. An influential critic as well, Gioia's 1991 volume Can Poetry Matter?, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award, is credited with helping to revive the role of poetry in American public culture. In 2014 he won the Aiken-Taylor Award for lifetime achievement in American poetry.

Reviews

From the start Hopkins's literary champions have been puzzled, skeptical, confused, or even hostile toward his conversion. . . . Ellsberg refutes these condescending views of the poet and the church. She pays a great poet the respect of taking his core beliefs seriously. . . . The Gospel in Gerard Manley Hopkins combines scholarly accuracy with critical acumen. Ellsberg's extensive commentary on Hopkins's verse and prose texts both elucidates his thought and provides illuminating context for the poems. Meanwhile she sustains her larger argument on the spiritual development of the author as a paradigmatic Catholic life of consecration, contemplation, sacrifice, and indeed sanctity. --Dana Gioia, poet laureate of California and author of Can Poetry Matter?, from the foreword
Some of Hopkins finest poems are sparked by the ardor of his spiritual practices of gratitude and wonder. But inwardly the poet struggled with depression and physical weakness. Ellsberg makes the most of a mix of his poetry, letters, journal entries, and sermons to illustrate his complex life. --Spirituality & Practice
I get drowsy with Descartes, nod off over Nietzsche, and am likely to keel over from Kierkegaard. But [this] was exciting. Gerard Manley Hopkins was a philosopher, and not only a philosopher but a prophet, and not only a prophet but a priest, for he saw the intimate eternal reality of all created things and called us to share the vision and knowledge that the whole world is charged with the grandeur of God. --Dwight Longenecker, The Imaginative Conservative
Both timely and original....This book will help readers meet Hopkins directly through his own words. It offers fresh insights into the great Jesuit and Catholic poet who so dearly loved God and God's creations, and who sang of them with glee. --America Magazine
Some of Hopkins' finest poems are sparked by the ardor of his spiritual practices of gratitude and wonder. But inwardly the poet struggled with depression and physical weakness. Ellsberg makes the most of a mix of his poetry, letters, journal entries, and sermons to illustrate his complex life. --Spirituality & Practice
Ellsberg is most effective in her contagious love of Hopkins' poetry... She is a true Hopkins believer and faithfully "discharges" her devotion to the poet, whether in her celebration of "The roll, the rise, the carol, the creation"--in poems that are in effect joyful love letters to God--or, by contrast, of the desolate beauty of the poet's bleak "winter world" ("To R.B."). She understands so well that both moods speak to our condition, and in a startling language that is like none other in its "rehearsal/ Of own, of abrupt self" ("Henry Purcell").--Hopkins Quarterly