The Good Times Are Killing Me

(Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$21.95  $20.19
Publisher
Drawn & Quarterly
Publish Date
Pages
184
Dimensions
5.8 X 7.3 X 0.9 inches | 0.9 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781770462618
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Lynda Barry has worked as a painter, cartoonist, writer, illustrator, playwright, editor, commentator and teacher and found they are very much alike. She is the Chazen Family Distinguished Chair in Art and Discovery Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she is also an Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Creativity in their Image Lab.

Reviews

"The story of two young people--Edna (white) and Bonna (African-American)--coming to terms with the inequalities of race and class... Written in the 1980s and set in the 1970s, the book remains as relevant as ever in the present."-Rookie

"This book is magic. Lynda Barry makes you laugh and breaks your heart all at once."-Gene Luen Yang

"The beautiful reissue of Lynda Barry's underrated autobiographical novel The Good Times Are Killing Me, about race and falling in love with records, gets 50 pages of new art, much of it Barry's folk-art-ish paintings of music pioneers."-Chicago Tribune

"A quick but heartfelt novel about race, class, and poverty in 1970s America, with each vignette connected by the protagonist's love of and connection to music."-Buzzfeed Best Books of 2017

"Barry conveys the anguish and confusion of youth discovering that society is riddled with prejudice, and her light touch is balanced by respect for her characters and their problems."-Publishers Weekly

"Absorbing and deceptively simple, Lynda Barry's 1988 illustrated novella is back in a new edition, and it feels like the right time. Difficult conversations about racial divides are still happening, so this story of a young girl's friendship with a black neighbour is affecting and relevant...With sparse punctuation and breathless, run-on sentences, the story is presented with a naΓ―ve voice in a powerful way."-Toronto Star

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