The Fractured Republic: Renewing America's Social Contract in the Age of Individualism (Revised)

(Author)
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Product Details

Price
$18.99
Publisher
Basic Books
Publish Date
Pages
288
Dimensions
5.4 X 0.9 X 8.1 inches | 0.55 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780465093243
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Yuval Levin is director of social, cultural, and constitutional studies at the American Enterprise Institute and the editor of National Affairs. A former member of the White House domestic policy staff under George W. Bush, he has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal, among many other publications. His previous books include The Fractured Republic and The Great Debate. He lives in Maryland.

Reviews

"Yuval Levin is one of the most important conservative intellectuals of his generation, so his books are worth reading almost regardless of the topic. But The Fractured Republic stands on its own as an indispensable piece of work."--Jonah Goldberg
"A rich, nuanced history of the last 70 years... The Fractured Republic is an invaluable resource for understanding how America came to its present predicament and what must be done to rescue it."--Charles Murray, National Review
"Should be required reading for all those trying to understand contemporary America."--Financial Times
"Mr. Levin has done conservatism a service by reining in nostalgia. His writing is precise, well-observed and witty in a sober sort of way."--The Economist
"Mr. Levin is among the Republican Party's great intellectual leaders and has proposed a new direction for conservatism. We'll soon learn whether the party's political leaders follow his wise advice."--J.D. Vance, Wall Street Journal
"Useful in helping us understand why conservative intellectuals have been so intensely opposed to Donald Trump."--New York Times Book Review
"A devastating indictment of the welfare state and a good primer for effective conservative policymaking in the future."--Tevi Troy, National Review Online
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