The Fourth Reich: The Specter of Nazism from World War II to the Present

Available

Product Details

Price
$29.95  $27.55
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publish Date
March 14, 2019
Pages
408
Dimensions
7.6 X 1.0 X 9.3 inches | 1.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781108497497

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About the Author

Gavriel D. Rosenfeld is Professor of History at Fairfield University, Connecticut. His area of specialization is the history and memory of the Nazi era. He is the author of several books, including Building after Auschwitz: Jewish Architecture and the Memory of the Holocaust (2011), which was a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award in the category of visual arts; The World Hitler Never Made: Alternate History and the Memory of Nazism (Cambridge, 2005); Munich and Memory: Architecture, Monuments and the Legacy of the Third Reich (2000), and the co-edited work, Beyond Berlin: Twelve German Cities Confront the Nazi Past (2008). He is also the editor of the forthcoming volume of Jewish alternate histories, 'If Only We Had Died in Egypt!' What Ifs of Jewish History from Abraham to Zionism, also to be published by Cambridge University Press. Rosenfeld is a frequent contributor to the Forward newspaper and edits the blog, The Counterfactual History Review.

Reviews

'Gavriel D. Rosenfeld's new book is a brilliant and very timely exploration of something that never happened. It examines how it is that people after WWII imagined the possibility of a Fourth Reich, in whatever form or shape. As the history of a political concept that spoke to the preoccupations of postwar transatlantic societies, it is a very distinctive addition to our understanding of the stability of democracy in postwar Germany and the postwar West more broadly.' Richard Steigmann-Gall, author of The Holy Reich: Nazi Conceptions of Christianity
'Gavriel D. Rosenfeld, the pioneer of counterfactual history, has written a disturbing book. The Fourth Reich illuminates that the fears and fantasies about a new type of Nazi regime have preoccupied Western societies since 1945. This book couldn't be more timely.' Thomas KΓΌhne, author of The Rise and Fall of Comradeship: Hitler's Soldiers, Male Bonding and Mass Violence in the Twentieth Century
'After two earlier forays into the Third Reich's counterfactual history, Gavriel D. Rosenfeld now returns for another equally original and imaginative exploration, patiently dissecting the dreams, anxieties, and speculations associated with the idea of a Fourth Reich. In retrieving these complicated and often surprising post-1945 after-lives of Hitler and his regime, no one is more careful and accomplished.' Geoff Eley, author of Nazism as Fascism: Violence, Ideology, and the Ground of Consent, 1930-1945
'This insightful book explores the history of the Fourth Reich: while it never existed, fears (and sometimes hopes) that it might come about certainly did. Rosenfeld sheds light on these, as well as on their political context and cultural expression. A fascinating and original study.' Bill Niven, author of Facing the Nazi Past
'Marshals a variety of sources - political speeches, newspaper clippings, slices of cinema - to offer a sharp counterfactual investigation that reveals how discourse on the Fourth Reich has meaningfully shaped postwar culture.' Brandon Tensley, Los Angeles Review of Books
'... captivating ... truly revelatory.' Thomas Meaney, New Statesman
'Intriguing ... Rosenfeld's thoughtful dissection of the origins and inflationary use of the term 'Fourth Reich' [is] timely and welcome.' Brendan Simms, Standpoint
'... very insightful ... These kind of counterfactuals reveal the power of the idea of the Fourth Reich.' Robert Eaglestone, Times Higher Education
'The real value of this book lies in its insights into the distorting power of historical memory ... [an] intriguing study.' Marcus Colla, The Times Literary Supplement
'American scholar Gavriel D. Rosenfeld deftly examines this slogan in all its variations, while reminding us that it was never more than a theoretical construct in post-war German history.' Sheldon Kirshner, The Times of Israel
'Stimulating mind candy ...' Fortean Times