The Fog of Peace: A Memoir of International Peacekeeping in the 21st Century

Available

Product Details

Price
$26.99
Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
Publish Date
May 12, 2015
Pages
331
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.0 X 0.8 inches | 1.2 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780815726302

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Reviews

The Fog of Peace is by far the best analysis of UN peacekeeping since Brian Urquhart's indispensable writings on the subject.--David Rieff, New York Review of Books


The Fog of Peace is by far the best analysis of UN peacekeeping since Brian Urquhart's indispensable writings on the subject.
--David Rieff, New York Review of Books

As can be expected from an author of Jean-Marie Guéhenno's experience and prescience, The Fog of Peace captures well the moral conundrums and diplomatic obstacles that the United Nations and its Department of Peacekeeping face in the post-cold war era. At a time when the international framework established to curtail conflict and human suffering is under increasing pressure, his book provides valuable insights and timely advice on how to strengthen our global security architecture.
--Kofi A. Annan, Secretary General of the United Nations, 1997-2006

In Afghanistan and Sudan I shared with Jean-Marie Guéhenno the accomplishments and the frustrations he portrays in The Fog of Peace. This honest and probing account captures the realities of peacekeeping in the twenty-first century. It is a first-hand recounting of some of the most difficult work the United Nations has undertaken.
--Lakhdar Brahimi, former UN Special Envoy to Syria and special representative to Haiti, South Africa, Afghanistan, and Iraq

Jean-Marie Guéhenno is a scholar-diplomat of immense integrity, intelligence, judgment, and charm. He won international respect during his eight-year stewardship of UN peacekeeping--no mean feat given those years coincided precisely with George W. Bush's presidency. What shines through this thoughtful and detailed account is the admirable way in which Guéhenno maintained his own moral compass amid a swirl of competing pragmatic and political imperatives, never succumbing to the weary cynicism that so often afflicts international public servants. We could have no better guide to navigating the "fog of peace."
--Gareth Evans, Foreign Minister of Australia, 1988-96, and President of the International Crisis Group, 2000-09