The February 2015 Assassination of Boris Nemtsov and the Flawed Trial of His Alleged Killers: An Exploration of Russia's "Crime of the 21st Century"

Available

Product Details

Price
$48.00
Publisher
Ibidem Press
Publish Date
Pages
220
Dimensions
5.8 X 8.3 X 0.4 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9783838211886
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About the Author

John B. Dunlop is Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace, Stanford University. Among his books are The Faces of Contemporary Russian Nationalism (1983), The Rise of Russia and the Fall of the Soviet Empire (1995), Russia Confronts Chechnya (1998), The 2002 Dubrovka and 2004 Beslan Hostage Crises (ibidem, 2006), and The Moscow Bombings of September 1999 (ibidem, 2014). His essays have appeared in, among other journals, Demokratizatsiya, Harvard Ukrainian Studies, Journal of Democracy, Journal of Cold War Studies, Problems of Post-Communism, and Survival.

Reviews

With this book, John Dunlop lives up to his reputation for unparalleled research into the crimes of the Kremlin. Dunlop leaves no stone unturned in his chilling account of the horrifying murder of Boris Nemtsov, pointing directly to Vladimir Putin and his security services as the culprits.--Amy Knight, author of Orders to Kill: The Putin Regime and Political Murder
This is a clear, convincing, and well-constructed study of one of the most significant and despicable political crimes of the early twenty-first century. Essential reading for those who want to understand the essence of Putinism while Putin himself is still alive.--Martin Dewhirst, Research Fellow, University of Glasgow
John Dunlop has performed a service for humanity. Relying on meticulous research, he shows that Boris Nemtsov was murdered for political reasons, that the official investigation and trial were a farce and that the order to kill Nemtsov could have come from only one person, Vladimir Putin. It is now up to the U.S. and others to draw the necessary conclusions.--David Satter, Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute, Washington, DC