The Ethnographic State: France and the Invention of Moroccan Islam

Available

Product Details

Price
$59.94
Publisher
University of California Press
Publish Date
Pages
288
Dimensions
6.2 X 1.0 X 8.9 inches | 1.1 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780520273818
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Edmund Burke III is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the author or editor of many works, including Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East (UC Press).

Reviews

"La composition brillamment dΓ©gagΓ©e par l'auteur." ("Brilliantly clear composition by the author.")--Mehdi Sakatni"lectures" (09/01/2015)
"4/5 . . . Highly engaging."-- (01/28/2015)
"The Ethnographic State is a significant contribution to Moroccan studies and to the history of imperialism in North Africa. . . . For students of Morocco, Burke's work is critical."-- (02/01/2016)
"Written with verve and wit, Edmund Burke's The Ethnographic State displays the deep erudition that has marked the author's career. Clearly in tune with the murmuring currents of change in Morocco today, Burke closes the book with the tantalizing line, 'The invention of Moroccan Islam and its successive transformations led to the forging of a powerful political discourse that still has currency. But for how much longer?'"--H-France
"The Ethnographic State provides an insightful overview of the creation and institutionalization of a national practice of Islam within a colonial context. Burke's detailed research on the formation of Moroccan Islam and the role of French scholarship on colonial policies will impact scholarship on Islam, colonialism, and state formation."--History of Religions
"A welcome addition to the growing literature on French colonial knowledge... a tour de force in terms of its breadth and depth, its synthesis of anglophone and francophone scholarship, and, last but not least, its splendid erudition lightly worn."--Journal of Modern History