The Divided Welfare State

Jacob S. Hacker (Author) Hacker Jacob S (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$34.99  $32.19
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publish Date
October 24, 2002
Pages
466
Dimensions
6.0 X 1.1 X 9.0 inches | 1.55 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780521013284
BISAC Categories:

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Jacob S. Hacker is the Stanley B. Resor Professor of Political Science at Yale University. A Fellow at the New America Foundation in Washington, DC, he is the author of The Great Risk Shift: The New Economic Insecurity and the Decline of the American Dream, The Divided Welfare State, and, with Paul Pierson, of American Amnesia: The Forgotten Roots of Our Prosperity; Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer--and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class; Off Center: The Republican Revolution and the Erosion of American Democracy. He has appeared recently on The NewsHour, MSNBC, All Things Considered, and Marketplace. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

Reviews

"A path breaking work that is likely to reorient the way political scientists and historians frame the study of social policy. Hacker persuasively argues that the so-called "private" provision of social benefits is the product of crucial public decision-making and financial support, and demonstrates in impressive detail the longer term implications that stem from decisions to support private benefits with public dollars. The Divided Welfare State is one of those rare works of cutting edge scholarship that will be read beyond the academy by public officials, policy makers and informed citizens eager to understand the powerful structural factors that make pension and health care reform so difficult to achieve in the United States." Brian Balogh, University of Virginia
"Hacker's study is an important resource for understanding why enactment of universal health insurance has been so difficult. His analysis is original and insightful. Politicians and political scientists alike will find this volume useful and thought provoking." Edward M. Kennedy, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts
"An extraordinary work. For the first time we see American social provision whole -- not just what it is not, but what it is. Thanks to Jacob Hacker's skillful blending of sophisticated theory and wide-ranging empirical analysis, we understand how this unique and often troubling mix of public and private action came about. And with this understanding we are far better placed to imagine, and work toward, a better future." Paul Pierson, Harvard University
"A work of extraordinary historical sweep and analytic power, The Divided Welfare State offers a provocative new angle of vision on the politics of social policy in the United States. Hacker's book is a must-read, not only for observers of modern American politics, but for all who want to know what lies behind today's disputes about health care reform and the "privatization" of Social Security." Theda Skocpol, Director of the Center for American Political Studies, Harvard University
"The subtitle nicely captures the flavour of this stimulating and absorbing analysis of the struggles over public and private social welfare in the United States. In a thoroughly researched study Hacker documents and explains the very different history and growth of pensions and health insurance in the United States. . . In many ways this is a splendid case-study of major parts of the social division of welfare within the United States, bringing out very clearly the complex interactions between public, tax and occupational welfare over the past century." Journal of Social Policy
"The strengths of Hacker's approach stem from the exhaustive historical research that he undertook, his mastery of detail, and his clarity of presentation. . . His scholarship is thorough enough to impress just about anyone." " The New Republic
" This ranks as one of the very best histories of the American welfare state. Hacker places the spotlight squarely on retirement pensions and health care, the two largest components of U.S. social policy, and thus provides a welcome counterpart to the many existing studies of poverty. His careful attention to the many tools of social welfare, and the constant interplay between public and private actors, leads him to make original and insightful connections. Ambitious in scope, yet disciplined with conceptual rigor and careful comparisons, the book should be read by anyone interested in modern welfare states, American exceptionalism, and path dependence in policy making." Christopher Howard, College of William & Mary
"The United States has long been held as an example of exceptionalism in the welfare state literature....In this brilliant (no less a word will do) book, Jacob Hacker gives a new twist to this story. In doing so, he has provided perhaps the most sophisticated analysis of the politics of social policy available, an analysis which has applications beyond the U.S." Is Rudolf Klein, Journal of Public Policy
"A brilliant book that will force Americans left, right and center to reconsider their ideas - and prejudices - about how our country provides social insurance and social services. An engaging and rigorous scholar, Hacker sheds light on a fact so obvious that scholars have often ignored it: in the United States, much of our welfare state is actually a system of private sector support. Hacker concludes that so much of what is touted as "The Third Way" is, in fact, the Old American Way. This is an indispensable work of history, political analysis and sophisticated common sense." E.J. Dionne Jr., Brookings Institution and Syndicated Columnist
"A stunning achievement that is a major contribution to the fields of political science, economics, history, and policy analysis. Hacker offers the definitive study of America's distinct system of private welfare benefits. Not only does he provide the most sophisticated account of how these benefits evolved and what impact they had on Americans polity, but he also forces us to rethink our most basic understanding of the logic behind America's public welfare state. A must-read for anyone interested in contemporary political history." Julian E. Zelizer, State University of New York at Albany