The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters

Available

Product Details

Price
$22.99  $21.15
Publisher
New Press
Publish Date
Pages
448
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.2 X 1.1 inches | 1.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781595589149

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About the Author

Frances Stonor Saunders is the author of The Devil's Broker and The Woman Who Shot Mussolini. She has worked as the arts editor of the New Statesman; writes and presents for BBC radio; and has written for Aretรฉ, The Guardian, Lapham's Quarterly, and the Los Angeles Times. She lives in London.

Reviews


Frances Stonor Saunders has almost single-handedly started off a branch of sub-history: the Cultural Cold War...?An extraordinarily good book, and I recommend it to anyone.
--Ian McEwan

A tale of intrigue and betrayal, with scene after scene as thrilling as any in a John le Carre novel.
--"Chronicle of Higher Education"

A major work of investigative history [and] an extremely valuable contribution to the all-important post-World War II record.
--Edward Said, "London Review of Books"

Avoids polemic and fits the fragments of elusive fact into a coherent and persuasive narrative.
--Lewis Lapham, "Los Angeles Times Book Review"

Makes clear the sinuous interlocking nature of American governmental, corporate and cultural life?...consistently fascinating.
--Michael Dirda, "The Washington Post Book World"
"Frances Stonor Saunders has almost single-handedly started off a branch of sub-history: the Cultural Cold War...An extraordinarily good book, and I recommend it to anyone."
--Ian McEwan

"A tale of intrigue and betrayal, with scene after scene as thrilling as any in a John le Carre novel."
--"Chronicle of Higher Education"

"A major work of investigative history [and] an extremely valuable contribution to the all-important post-World War II record."
--Edward Said, "London Review of Books"

"Avoids polemic and fits the fragments of elusive fact into a coherent and persuasive narrative."
--Lewis Lapham, "Los Angeles Times Book Review"

"Makes clear the sinuous interlocking nature of American governmental, corporate and cultural life?...consistently fascinating."
--Michael Dirda, "The Washington Post Book World"

"A tale of intrigue and betrayal, with scene after scene as thrilling as any in a John le Carrรฉ novel."
--Chronicle of Higher Education

"A major work of investigative history [and] an extremely valuable contribution to the all-important post-World War II record."
--Edward Said, London Review of Books

"Avoids polemic and fits the fragments of elusive fact into a coherent and persuasive narrative."
--Lewis Lapham, Los Angeles Times Book Review

"Makes clear the sinuous interlocking nature of American governmental, corporate and cultural life . . . consistently fascinating."
--Michael Dirda, The Washington Post Book World