The Count of Monte Cristo (100 Copy Collector's Edition)

Alexandre Dumas (Author)
Available

Description

On the day of his wedding, Edmond Dantès is falsely accused of treason, arrested, and imprisoned without trial in a grim island fortress off Marseilles. A fellow prisoner inspires Dantès to escape and guides him to a fortune in treasure. Dantès returns home under the pseudonym of the mysterious Count of Monte Cristo, in order to avenge himself on the men who conspired to destroy him.

The Count of Monte Cristo takes place in France, Italy, and islands in the Mediterranean during the historical events of 1815-1839: the era of the Bourbon Restoration through the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. It begins just before the Hundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after his exile). The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book, an adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy, and forgiveness. It centres around a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune, and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.

This cloth-bound book includes a Victorian inspired dust-jacket, and is limited to 100 copies.

Product Details

Price
$83.94
Publisher
Royal Classics
Publish Date
November 12, 2019
Pages
1108
Dimensions
5.98 X 9.02 X 2.25 inches | 0.04 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781772268256

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About the Author

Alexandre Dumas, born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie; 24 July 1802 - 5 December 1870), was a French writer. His works have been translated into nearly 100 languages, and he is one of the most widely read French authors. Many of his historical novels of high adventure were originally published as serials, including The Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After, and The Vicomte de Bragelonne: Ten Years Later. His novels have been adapted since the early twentieth century for nearly 200 films. Prolific in several genres, Dumas began his career by writing plays, which were successfully produced from the first. He also wrote numerous magazine articles and travel books; his published works totalled 100,000 pages. In the 1840s, Dumas founded the Théâtre Historique in Paris. The English playwright Watts Phillips, who knew Dumas in his later life, described him as "the most generous, large-hearted being in the world. He also was the most delightfully amusing and egotistical creature on the face of the Earth. His tongue was like a windmill - once set in motion, you never knew when he would stop, especially if the theme was himself."