The Castle in Transylvania

Jules Verne (Author) Charlotte Mandell (Translator)
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Description

Back from the dead: the first ever zombie story
Before there was Dracula, there was The Castle in Transylvania. In its first new translation in over 100 years, this is the first book to set a gothic horror story, featuring people who may or may not be dead, in Transylvania.
In a remote village cut off from the outside world by the dark mountains of Transylvania, the townspeople have come to suspect that supernatural forces must be responsible for the menacing apparitions emanating from the castle looming over them.
But a visiting young count scoffs at their fears. He vows to liberate the villagers by pitting his reason against the forces of superstition - until he sees his dead beloved walking the halls of the castle....

Product Details

Price
$14.95
Publisher
Melville House Publishing
Publish Date
July 06, 2010
Pages
223
Dimensions
5.0 X 6.9 X 0.6 inches | 0.44 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781935554080
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Jules Verne was born in Nantes, France in 1828. One of the most imaginative writers of the nineteenth century, he wrote about air, space, and underwater travel long before such things were possible, leading many today to call him "The Father of Science Fiction." Among his books are A Journey to the Center of the Earth, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Around the World In Eighty Days, and From the Earth to the Moon. He died in 1905.

Reviews


"This book is an illuminating rarity among Verne's output, a Gothic-steeped romance whose scientific aspects are kept hidden till the climax.... let us pay homage to the fine new translation by the experienced and talented Charlotte Mandell.... This creative upgrade in the quality of the prose and fidelity to the original text persists throughout the novel, and sets high standards for the reader's enjoyment....Verne's tale remains compulsively readable."
Paul DiFilippo, Salon