The Cartographer of No Man's Land

(Author)
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Product Details

Price
$25.95
Publisher
Liveright Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
Pages
384
Dimensions
6.75 X 1.3 X 9.6 inches | 1.3 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780871403766
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

P. S. Duffy grew up in Baltimore, Maryland, and spent summers sailing in Nova Scotia. She is a science writer for the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where she lives with her husband.

Reviews

Duffy's astounding first novel depicts terrifyingly real battle scenes, rich in subtle details, displaying the intimacies shared among soldiers and the memories that haunt them. VERDICT... Essential reading for historical fiction lovers and war story fans alike; very highly recommended.
[T]hanks to Duffy's full realization--each character, however minor, is a distinct personality; the action is grounded in closely observed details of fishing life and trench warfare; and her patience in developing the cast of characters makes for an unusually rich novel. In addition, the world of shipping and the uncertainty of the uncharted front line provide poignant metaphors for the characters' navigation of conflict, loss, and change, as well as their journey back to each other--and to themselves.
Duffy's well-researched account of bloody 1917 battle of Vimy Ridge should satisfy even the most die-hard of WWI buffs.
Brilliant. The description of front line action in the trenches is impressively real, and the ending blessedly free from sentimentality. Altogether a remarkable debut.--Simon Mawer, author of Trapeze and The Glass Room
Debut author P.S. Duffy captures the brutal intensity of the war in her delicate, atmospheric prose (star shells light the sky 'with a cascading trail of sparks'), but it's the parallel story of how Hettie and Angus's 14-year-old son survive in his absence--while protecting an innocent German school teacher--that keeps you riveted. Be it at home in the village or deep in a battle, 'Life isn't without much risk, ' Angus comes to realize, as does his family. But it's our response to those risks that draws the map of our character.
Physical and emotional geography are beautifully rendered, and Duffy's vivid descriptions illuminate war's transformative effect in fresh ways. Well-nuanced characters and carefully choreographed (but still surprising) situations make this a strong debut.
The Cartographer of No Man's Land is less of a book about maps and World War I than it is about boys becoming men, men discovering who they are, and the connections between fathers and sons. The book travels from the mud and blood of the front to a fishing village in Nova Scotia, all the while showing how the shifting landscape of war can both divide a family and bring it together. P.S. Duffy spent many years writing this remarkable debut; The Cartographer of No Man's Land was worth the wait.--Alexi Zentner, author of Touch