The Branch Will Not Break: Poems

Available

Product Details

Price
$14.95
Publisher
Wesleyan University Press
Publish Date
Pages
59
Dimensions
5.9 X 0.2 X 7.8 inches | 0.2 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780819510181

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

JAMES WRIGHT was born in Martins Ferry, Ohio, in 1927. He was well known for his translations of such Spanish poets as Pablo Neruda and CΓ©sar Vallejo and for his poems about the Midwest. He received the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1972 for his Collected Poems. Other books of his published by Wesleyan are Saint Judas, Shall We Gather at the River, and Above the River: The Complete Poems (co published with Farrar, Straus and Giroux). James Wright died on March 26, 1980, at the age of 52.

Reviews

"These poems are splendidly direct, magnificently simple; sometimes the phrasing is so elegantly obvious that the heart jumps at it...This is a book which ought to be read at least three times, and then maybe once a month for as long as one lives. The first three readings are essential, if the reader is going to get much from these poems; they seem to make so few demands, they look so obvious, they are so subtle."--Hal Smith, Epoch

"I like the force here, the clarity and directness, the language bound intimately with idea and image; and the harshness, the precision, the sense of fitness and place for every syllable."--Harry Strickhausen, Poetry

"These poems are splendidly direct, magnificently simple; sometimes the phrasing is so elegantly obvious that the heart jumps at itThis is a book which ought to be read at least three times, and then maybe once a month for as long as one lives. The first three readings are essential, if the reader is going to get much from these poems; they seem to make so few demands, they look so obvious, they are so subtle."--Hal Smith, Epoch

"His is a world haunted by the past and apprehensive of the future. It is, symbolically, the world of contemporary experience."--Gene Baro, The New York Times Book Review