The Bird Way: A New Look at How Birds Talk, Work, Play, Parent, and Think

Available

Product Details

Price
$28.00  $25.76
Publisher
Penguin Press
Publish Date
Pages
368
Dimensions
6.3 X 9.4 X 1.3 inches | 1.36 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780735223011

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About the Author

Jennifer Ackerman has been writing about science and nature for three decades. She is the author of eight books, including The Genius of Birds, which has been translated into twenty languages and the forthcoming The Bird Way: A New Look at How Birds Talk, Work, Play, Parent, and Think. Her articles and essays have appeared in Scientific American, National Geographic, The New York Times, and many other publications, Ackerman is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship in Nonfiction, a Bunting Fellowship, and a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Reviews

"In The Bird Way, Jennifer Ackerman digs deeper and ranges farther into bird behavior, pulling tasty stories out of rich ground as she hops across the continents [ . . . ] Like a bowerbird, Ms. Ackerman gathers and displays treasures to amaze and delight--then lets the scientists' stories take center stage [. . .] Refreshingly, Ackerman spotlights a number of female researchers." --Wall Street Journal

"Ackerman's vibrant writing ensures that all things bird are thoroughly compelling and enjoyable." --Booklist, starred review

"Ackerman reminds readers that birds are thinking beings . . . She brings scientific research alive with personal field observations and accounts of her encounters with colorful and fascinating birds . . . [The Bird Way] will engage all readers interested in learning more about birds and natural history."--Library Journal, starred review

"A brightly original book . . . Ackerman is a smooth writer; her presentation of ideas is deft, and her anecdotes are consistently engaging . . . [She] demonstrates bird science as an evolving discipline that is consistently fascinating, and she offers brilliant discussions of the use of smell, long overlooked but indeed deployed for navigation; courtship signals; predator avoidance, and, not surprisingly, locating food. "--Kirkus Reviews, starred review