The Believer, Issue 114

(Editor) (Editor)
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Product Details

Price
$12.00  $11.04
Publisher
Believer Magazine
Publish Date
Pages
128
Dimensions
8.5 X 0.4 X 9.9 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781940450629
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Heidi Julavits was born in Portland, Maine, in 1968. She graduated from Dartmouth College and has an MFA from Columbia University. Her short stories have appeared in Harper's, Esquire, the Best American Short Stories, Zoetrope, among other places. Her nonfiction has appeared in the New York Times, Elle, and the Best American Travel Essays. She is a founding coeditor of the Believer, the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and was a finalist for the New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award. She lives in Manhattan with her husband, Ben Marcus, and their two children.

Karolina Waclawiak is the author of the critically acclaimed novels How to Get Into the Twin Palms and THE INVADERS. AWOL, a feature she co-wrote with Deb Shoval, premiered at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival. Formerly an editor at the Believer, she is now the Executive Editor, Culture at BuzzFeed News. Karolina received her BFA in Screenwriting from USC and her MFA in Fiction from Columbia University. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, VQR, the Believer, Hazlitt, and other publications.

Vendela Vida is the award-winning author of six books, including Let the Northern Lights Erase Your Name and The Diver's Clothes Lie Empty. Her new novel, We Run the Tides, will be published by Ecco on February 9, 2021. She is a founding editor of The Believer and coeditor of The Believer Book of Writers Talking to Writers and Confidence, or the Appearance of Confidence, a collection of interviews with musicians. She was a founding board member of 826 Valencia, the San Francisco writing center for youth, and lives in the Bay Area with her family.

Reviews


The "Believer.".. puts out a welcome mat for pluralism and wide-eyed curiosity... decidedly youthful, not only in their characteristic generational concernsthe habit of nonchalantly blending pop culture, literary esoterica and academic theory, for instance, or the unnerving ability to appear at once mocking and sincerebut also in the sense of bravado and grievance that ripples through their pages.
"New York Times"
It s got people talking in the lofty reaches of the book world, andwith its high-low mix of literary and pop-culture commentary and McSweeney's pedigreeit's a magnet for younger readers.
"San Francisco Chronicle"
Focusing on the art, not the business, of writing, "Believer" is smart, jaded and a bit self-indulgent, just like a good literary magazine should be.
"Chicago Tribune"
An impassioned and sometimes precious magazine that, with its retro typefaces and eccentric illustrations, seemed to revel self-consciously in its identity as printed matter.
"Los Angeles Times"
Without a doubt, this "Believer" is heaven-sent.
"Washington Post""
The "Believer.".. puts out a welcome mat for pluralism and wide-eyed curiosity... decidedly youthful, not only in their characteristic generational concernsthe habit of nonchalantly blending pop culture, literary esoterica and academic theory, for instance, or the unnerving ability to appear at once mocking and sincerebut also in the sense of bravado and grievance that ripples through their pages.
"New York Times"
It s got people talking in the lofty reaches of the book world, andwith its high-low mix of literary and pop-culture commentary and McSweeney's pedigreeit's a magnet for younger readers.
"San Francisco Chronicle"
Focusing on the art, not the business, of writing, "Believer" is smart, jaded and a bit self-indulgent, just like a good literary magazine should be.
"Chicago Tribune"
An impassioned and sometimes precious magazine that, with its retro typefaces and eccentric illustrations, seemed to revel self-consciously in its identity as printed matter.
"Los Angeles Times"
Without a doubt, this "Believer" is heaven-sent.
"Washington Post""
The Believer... puts out a welcome mat for pluralism and wide-eyed curiosity... decidedly youthful, not only in their characteristic generational concernsthe habit of nonchalantly blending pop culture, literary esoterica and academic theory, for instance, or the unnerving ability to appear at once mocking and sincerebut also in the sense of bravado and grievance that ripples through their pages.
New York Times
It s got people talking in the lofty reaches of the book world, andwith its high-low mix of literary and pop-culture commentary and McSweeney's pedigreeit's a magnet for younger readers.
San Francisco Chronicle
Focusing on the art, not the business, of writing, Believer is smart, jaded and a bit self-indulgent, just like a good literary magazine should be.
Chicago Tribune
An impassioned and sometimes precious magazine that, with its retro typefaces and eccentric illustrations, seemed to revel self-consciously in its identity as printed matter.
Los Angeles Times
Without a doubt, this Believer is heaven-sent.
Washington Post"
"The Believer... puts out a welcome mat for pluralism and wide-eyed curiosity... decidedly youthful, not only in their characteristic generational concerns--the habit of nonchalantly blending pop culture, literary esoterica and academic theory, for instance, or the unnerving ability to appear at once mocking and sincere--but also in the sense of bravado and grievance that ripples through their pages."
--New York Times

"It's got people talking in the lofty reaches of the book world, and--with its high-low mix of literary and pop-culture commentary and McSweeney's pedigree--it's a magnet for younger readers."
--San Francisco Chronicle

"Focusing on the art, not the business, of writing, Believer is smart, jaded and a bit self-indulgent, just like a good literary magazine should be."
--Chicago Tribune

"An impassioned and sometimes precious magazine that, with its retro typefaces and eccentric illustrations, seemed to revel self-consciously in its identity as printed matter."
--Los Angeles Times

"Without a doubt, this Believer is heaven-sent."
--Washington Post