The Bad News Bears in Breaking Training

Josh Wilker (Author) Sean Howe (Editor)
Available

Description

In 1977, The Bad News Bears in Breaking Training had a moment in the sun. A glowing junk sculpture of American genres--sports flick, coming-of-age story, family melodrama, after-school special, road narrative--the film cashed in on the previous year's success of its predecessor, The Bad News Bears. Arguing against the sequel's dismissal as a cultural afterthought, Josh Wilker lovingly rescues from the oblivion of cinema history a quintessential expression of American resilience and joy.

Rushed into theaters by Paramount when the beleaguered film industry was suffering from "acute sequelitis," the (undeniably flawed) movie miraculously transcended its limitations to become a gathering point for heroic imagery drawn from American mythology. Considered in context, the film's unreasonable optimism, rooted in its characters' sincere desire to keep playing, is a powerful response to the political, economic, and social stresses of the late 1970s.

To Wilker's surprise, despite repeated viewings, The Bad News Bears in Breaking Training continues to move him. Its huge heart makes it not only the ultimate fantasy of the baseball-obsessed American boy, but a memorable iteration of that barbed vision of pure sunshine itself, the American dream.

Product Details

Price
$12.95  $11.91
Publisher
Soft Skull Press
Publish Date
June 14, 2011
Pages
120
Dimensions
4.79 X 0.35 X 6.55 inches | 0.2 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781593764180
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Josh Wilker writes about his life and childhood baseball cards at cardboardgods.net. He has an MFA in fiction writing from Vermont College and is a winner of the Howard Frank Mosher Prize for Short Fiction. He lives in Chicago.

Sean Howe is the editor of Give Our Regards to the Atomsmashers!: Writers on Comics and the Deep Focus series of film books. He is a former editor and critic at Entertainment Weekly, and his writing has appeared in New York, The Los Angeles Times, Slate, Spin, and The Village Voice. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.