The Bad Food Bible: Why You Can (and Maybe Should) Eat Everything You Thought You Couldn't

(Author) (Foreword by)
Available

Product Details

Price
$14.99  $13.79
Publisher
Mariner Books
Publish Date
Pages
272
Dimensions
5.2 X 8.0 X 0.9 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781328505774

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About the Author

DR. AARON CARROLL is a professor of pediatrics and the director of the Center for Health Policy and Professionalism Research at Indiana University School of Medicine. Coauthor of three previous books, he hosts YouTube's popular "Healthcare Triage" channel and contributes to the New York Times at the Upshot blog.

Reviews

"Eat, drink and relax, already. As Aaron Carroll shows in The Bad Food Bible, when it comes to nutritional health, much of what we've been told to worry about is either hyped or hogwash."
--Michael Moss, best-selling author of Salt Sugar Fat

"Aaron Carroll's brilliant advice has changed my health and my life. Forget about all the fads: here's the real truth about food and the role it plays in our lives."
--John Green, best-selling author of The Fault in Our Stars

"A satisfying book that challenges the very notion of food morality and frees us up for some seriously delicious, sinful eating."
--Nina Teicholz, best-selling author of The Big Fat Surprise

"The Bad Food Bible is a breath of fresh air in a media environment saturated with eating dos and don'ts. For anyone confused by single-study headlines or looking to make sense of how to eat healthy with a world of so many options, Aaron Carroll's advice will certainly deliver."
--Sarah Kliff, senior policy correspondent, Vox.com

"In The Bad Food Bible, Aaron Carroll turns down the food-fear sirens to zero, and responsibly explains what science actually says about the food we eat. Instead of demonizing prosciutto or wine, Carroll reminds us that the odd indulgence isn't going to kill anyone, but a lifetime of poor nutrition might--sane and welcome advice in a time of great nutrition confusion."
--Julia Belluz, senior health correspondent, Vox.com