The Astronomer & the Witch: Johannes Kepler's Fight for His Mother

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Product Details

Price
$29.95
Publisher
Oxford University Press, USA
Publish Date
Pages
272
Dimensions
6.2 X 9.3 X 0.8 inches | 1.65 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780198736776

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About the Author

Ulinka Rublack is Professor at the University of Cambridge and has published widely on early modern European history as well as approaches to history. She edited the Oxford Concise Companion to History (2011), and, most recently, the Oxford Handbook of the Protestant Reformation (2016). Hermonographs include Reformation Europe (2005), The Crimes of Women in Early Modern Germany (1999), and Dressing Up: Cultural Identity in Renaissance Europe (2010), which won the Roland H. Bainton Prize.

Reviews


..".[A]n enthralling, many-sided book.... [A]t once a vivid introduction to a fascinating social and cultural world; a profound analysis of a witch trial...and a deep study of one of the greatest scientists who ever lived..." --Professor Anthony Grafton, Princeton University


"Gripping and inspiring, this tale of the six-year battle to clear Katharina Kepler of the charge of witchcraft yields striking new insights into the personalities and families involved, their communities and their culture.... The past, with its hopes and fears, comes wonderfully to life in this scholarly masterwork." --Professor Nicholas Jardine, University of Cambridge




..".[A]n enthralling, many-sided book... [A]t once a vivid introduction to a fascinating social and cultural world; a profound analysis of a witch trial...and a deep study of one of the greatest scientists who ever lived..." --Professor Anthony Grafton, Princeton University


"Gripping and inspiring, this tale of the six-year battle to clear Katharina Kepler of the charge of witchcraft yields striking new insights into the personalities and families involved, their communities and their culture... The past, with its hopes and fears, comes wonderfully to life in this scholarly masterwork." --Professor Nicholas Jardine, University of Cambridge


"This book takes you right to the heart of life in the seventeenth century, with all its sense of intellectual possibility, its dreams and its fears. Rublack tells a shocking story. How was it possible for the mother of the famous scientist Kepler to be accused of witchcraft, and why did she come to trial? In gripping prose, Rublack shows how the case destroyed those involved in it. She makes us understand how witchcraft could be credible and why people feared it so much. She makes us understand the psychological wellsprings of Kepler's work. And she presents a whole new account of scientific thinking and its relationship to natural knowledge at the dawn of a new era. The most compelling book I have read for a long time." --Professor Lyndal Roper, University of Oxford


"Gives readers a nuanced look at a world in which most people, including Kepler, believed that witches existed." -- Publisher's Weekly


"It is a delight to read, and no attentive reader can finish it without a better understanding of what its author set out to clarify--and without better understandings of so much more."-Edmund M. Kern, Austrian Studies Newsmagazine




..".[A]n enthralling, many-sided book... [A]t once a vivid introduction to a fascinating social and cultural world; a profound analysis of a witch trial...and a deep study of one of the greatest scientists who ever lived..." --Professor Anthony Grafton, Princeton University


"Gripping and inspiring, this tale of the six-year battle to clear Katharina Kepler of the charge of witchcraft yields striking new insights into the personalities and families involved, their communities and their culture... The past, with its hopes and fears, comes wonderfully to life in this scholarly masterwork." --Professor Nicholas Jardine, University of Cambridge


"This book takes you right to the heart of life in the seventeenth century, with all its sense of intellectual possibility, its dreams and its fears. Rublack tells a shocking story. How was it possible for the mother of the famous scientist Kepler to be accused of witchcraft, and why did she come to trial? In gripping prose, Rublack shows how the case destroyed those involved in it. She makes us understand how witchcraft could be credible and why people feared it so much. She makes us understand the psychological wellsprings of Kepler's work. And she presents a whole new account of scientific thinking and its relationship to natural knowledge at the dawn of a new era. The most compelling book I have read for a long time." --Professor Lyndal Roper, University of Oxford


"Gives readers a nuanced look at a world in which most people, including Kepler, believed that witches existed." -- Publisher's Weekly


"It is a delight to read, and no attentive reader can finish it without a better understanding of what its author set out to clarify--and without better understandings of so much more."-Edmund M. Kern, Austrian Studies Newsmagazine




"Rublack has written a forceful book It is a breath-taking account of a brave family who boldly fought for justice. A wide audience of readers will affirm the simple principle that history at its best is profoundly personal."--Early Science and Medicine


..".[A]n enthralling, many-sided book... [A]t once a vivid introduction to a fascinating social and cultural world; a profound analysis of a witch trial...and a deep study of one of the greatest scientists who ever lived..." --Professor Anthony Grafton, Princeton University


"Gripping and inspiring, this tale of the six-year battle to clear Katharina Kepler of the charge of witchcraft yields striking new insights into the personalities and families involved, their communities and their culture... The past, with its hopes and fears, comes wonderfully to life in this scholarly masterwork." --Professor Nicholas Jardine, University of Cambridge


"This book takes you right to the heart of life in the seventeenth century, with all its sense of intellectual possibility, its dreams and its fears. Rublack tells a shocking story. How was it possible for the mother of the famous scientist Kepler to be accused of witchcraft, and why did she come to trial? In gripping prose, Rublack shows how the case destroyed those involved in it. She makes us understand how witchcraft could be credible and why people feared it so much. She makes us understand the psychological wellsprings of Kepler's work. And she presents a whole new account of scientific thinking and its relationship to natural knowledge at the dawn of a new era. The most compelling book I have read for a long time." --Professor Lyndal Roper, University of Oxford


"Gives readers a nuanced look at a world in which most people, including Kepler, believed that witches existed." -- Publisher's Weekly


"It is a delight to read, and no attentive reader can finish it without a better understanding of what its author set out to clarify--and without better understandings of so much more."-Edmund M. Kern, Austrian Studies Newsmagazine




"Excellent ... meticulously researched and wonderfully readable." -- John Banville, Literary Review


"An enthralling book." -- Jennifer Rampling, Nature


"Rublack tells [this] story with a novelist's panache. Even if you know what happened, it's a compelling book. She sketches the vivid details that make the time, place and characters come to life ... The Tale of the Witch and the Mathematician - unmissable." -- Mark Greener, Fortean Times




"Rublack has written a forceful book...It is a breath-taking account of a brave family who boldly fought for justice. A wide audience of readers will affirm the simple principle that history at its best is profoundly personal."--Early Science and Medicine


"Excellent...meticulously researched and wonderfully readable."--John Banville, Literary Review


"An enthralling book." -- Jennifer Rampling, Nature


"Rublack tells [this] story with a novelist's panache. Even if you know what happened, it's a compelling book. She sketches the vivid details that make the time, place and characters come to life ... The Tale of the Witch and the Mathematician - unmissable." -- Mark Greener, Fortean Times




"Rublack has written a forceful book....It is a breath-taking account of a brave family who boldly fought for justice. A wide audience of readers will affirm the simple principle that history at its best is profoundly personal."--Early Science and Medicine


"Excellent...meticulously researched and wonderfully readable."--John Banville, Literary Review


"An enthralling book."--Jennifer Rampling, Nature


"Rublack tells [this] story with a novelist's panache. Even if you know what happened, it's a compelling book. She sketches the vivid details that make the time, place and characters come to life....The Tale of the Witch and the Mathematician--unmissable."--Mark Greener, Fortean Times