The Adventures of Henry Thoreau: A Young Man's Unlikely Path to Walden Pond

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Product Details

Price
$27.00
Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Publish Date
Pages
372
Dimensions
5.88 X 8.51 X 1.23 inches | 1.22 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781620401958
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Michael Sims is the author of the acclaimed The Story of Charlotte's Web, Apollo's Fire: A Day on Earth in Nature and Imagination, Adam's Navel: A Natural and Cultural History of the Human Form, and editor of Dracula's Guest: A Connoisseur's Collection of Victorian Vampire Stories and The Dead Witness: A Connoisseur's Collection of Victorian Detective Stories. He lives in western Pennsylvania.

Reviews

"[A] surpassingly vivid and vital chronicle of Thoreau's formative years. As Sims portrays a solemn boy nicknamed "the Judge," we gain fresh understanding of Thoreau's choices and convictions on his way to becoming a seminal environmentalist and civil-disobedience guru." -"Booklist""An amiable and fresh take on the legendary sage of Walden Pond...an animated portrait. Sims has once again proven himself to be a distinctive writer on the subjects of human nature and humans in nature." -"Bookpage"[A] lively biography...Nature lovers will revel in the vivid descriptions of Thoreau's adventures and mishaps, fromplaying the flute to a mouse, to boat trips on the Concord river...Sims explores the development of a bookish and sometimes prickly young man into the icon he is today." --"Financial Times""An affectionate and lively recreation of the world that surrounded [Thoreau]." -"Christian Science Monitor," picked as one of the 10 Best Books of February"I confess I picked up this biography not because of a burning interest in Thoreau . . . but because I loved Michael Sims' previous book about E. B. White and the writing of Charlotte's Web. Sims made White's youthful world of 1920s New York come alive and he does the same thing here for Thoreau's Concord. . . . "The Adventures of Henry Thoreau" is a rich, entertaining testament to the triumph of a young man who never comfortably fit in, but who made a place for himself, nonetheless." -Maureen Corrigan, "Fresh Air""Sims offers intriguing sidelights and memorable details. . . [he] helps us to see Thoreau as a colorful, crotchety human being." -"Washington Post""Sims gracefully captures what he calls Thoreau's 'ecstatic response to nature.'" -"Wall Street Journal""A well-researched and richly detailed portrait... The Henry David Thoreau portrayed here is no 'marble bust of an icon.' He's restless, prickly and possessed of a relentless intellectual curiosity--a complex, fully realized human being. With this picture in mind, anyone who admires Thoreau's life and work will view him with fresh eyes." -"Shelf Awareness""Sims creates a sensuous natural environment in which to appreciate his subject." -"Kirkus Reviews"
"Sims creates a sensuous natural environment in which to appreciate his subject." --"Kirkus Reviews""""[A] surpassingly vivid and vital chronicle of Thoreau's formative years. As Sims portrays a solemn boy nicknamed "the Judge," we gain fresh understanding of Thoreau's choices and convictions on his way to becoming a seminal environmentalist and civil-disobedience guru." --"Booklist""[A] lively biography . . . Nature lovers will revel in the vivid descriptions of Thoreau's adventures and mishaps, fromplaying the flute to a mouse, to boat trips on the Concord river . . . Sims explores the development of a bookish and sometimes prickly young man into the icon he is today." --"Financial Times""An amiable and fresh take on the legendary sage of Walden Pond . . . an animated portrait. Sims has once again proven himself to be a distinctive writer on the subjects of human nature and humans in nature." --"Bookpage""An affectionate and lively recreation of the world that surrounded [Thoreau]." --"Christian Science Monitor," picked as one of the 10 Best Books of February"I confess I picked up this biography not because of a burning interest in Thoreau . . . but because I loved Michael Sims' previous book about E. B. White and the writing of Charlotte's Web. Sims made White's youthful world of 1920s New York come alive and he does the same thing here for Thoreau's Concord. . . . "The Adventures of Henry Thoreau" is a rich, entertaining testament to the triumph of a young man who never comfortably fit in, but who made a place for himself, nonetheless." --Maureen Corrigan, "Fresh Air""A well-researched and richly detailed portrait . . . The Henry David Thoreau portrayed here is no 'marble bust of an icon.' He's restless, prickly and possessed of a relentless intellectual curiosity--a complex, fully realized human being. With this picture in mind, anyone who admires Thoreau's life and work will view him with fresh eyes." --"Shelf Awareness""Sims offers intriguing sidelights and memorable details . . . [he] helps us to see Thoreau as a colorful, crotchety human being." --"Washington Post""Sims gracefully captures what he calls Thoreau's 'ecstatic response to nature.'" --"Wall Street Journal""[A] highly readable book . . . draws from an impressively broad range of early writings from those who knew Thoreau personally, and the result is indeed a very human 'Henry' as opposed to, as Sims notes, 'a marble bust of an icon.'"""--"CHOICE"

Sims creates a sensuous natural environment in which to appreciate his subject. "Kirkus Reviews"

[A] surpassingly vivid and vital chronicle of Thoreau's formative years. As Sims portrays a solemn boy nicknamed "the Judge," we gain fresh understanding of Thoreau's choices and convictions on his way to becoming a seminal environmentalist and civil-disobedience guru. "Booklist"

[A] lively biography . . . Nature lovers will revel in the vivid descriptions of Thoreau's adventures and mishaps, fromplaying the flute to a mouse, to boat trips on the Concord river . . . Sims explores the development of a bookish and sometimes prickly young man into the icon he is today. "Financial Times"

An amiable and fresh take on the legendary sage of Walden Pond . . . an animated portrait. Sims has once again proven himself to be a distinctive writer on the subjects of human nature and humans in nature. "Bookpage"

An affectionate and lively recreation of the world that surrounded [Thoreau]. "Christian Science Monitor, picked as one of the 10 Best Books of February"

I confess I picked up this biography not because of a burning interest in Thoreau . . . but because I loved Michael Sims' previous book about E. B. White and the writing of Charlotte's Web. Sims made White's youthful world of 1920s New York come alive and he does the same thing here for Thoreau's Concord. . . . "The Adventures of Henry Thoreau" is a rich, entertaining testament to the triumph of a young man who never comfortably fit in, but who made a place for himself, nonetheless. "Maureen Corrigan, Fresh Air"

A well-researched and richly detailed portrait . . . The Henry David Thoreau portrayed here is no marble bust of an icon.' He's restless, prickly and possessed of a relentless intellectual curiosity--a complex, fully realized human being. With this picture in mind, anyone who admires Thoreau's life and work will view him with fresh eyes. "Shelf Awareness"

Sims offers intriguing sidelights and memorable details . . . [he] helps us to see Thoreau as a colorful, crotchety human being. "Washington Post"

Sims gracefully captures what he calls Thoreau's ecstatic response to nature.' "Wall Street Journal"

[A] highly readable book . . . draws from an impressively broad range of early writings from those who knew Thoreau personally, and the result is indeed a very human 'Henry' as opposed to, as Sims notes, 'a marble bust of an icon. "CHOICE""

"Sims creates a sensuous natural environment in which to appreciate his subject." --Kirkus Reviews

"[A] surpassingly vivid and vital chronicle of Thoreau's formative years. As Sims portrays a solemn boy nicknamed "the Judge," we gain fresh understanding of Thoreau's choices and convictions on his way to becoming a seminal environmentalist and civil-disobedience guru." --Booklist

"[A] lively biography . . . Nature lovers will revel in the vivid descriptions of Thoreau's adventures and mishaps, fromplaying the flute to a mouse, to boat trips on the Concord river . . . Sims explores the development of a bookish and sometimes prickly young man into the icon he is today." --Financial Times

"An amiable and fresh take on the legendary sage of Walden Pond . . . an animated portrait. Sims has once again proven himself to be a distinctive writer on the subjects of human nature and humans in nature." --Bookpage

"An affectionate and lively recreation of the world that surrounded [Thoreau]." --Christian Science Monitor, picked as one of the 10 Best Books of February

"I confess I picked up this biography not because of a burning interest in Thoreau . . . but because I loved Michael Sims' previous book about E. B. White and the writing of Charlotte's Web. Sims made White's youthful world of 1920s New York come alive and he does the same thing here for Thoreau's Concord. . . . The Adventures of Henry Thoreau is a rich, entertaining testament to the triumph of a young man who never comfortably fit in, but who made a place for himself, nonetheless." --Maureen Corrigan, Fresh Air

"A well-researched and richly detailed portrait . . . The Henry David Thoreau portrayed here is no 'marble bust of an icon.' He's restless, prickly and possessed of a relentless intellectual curiosity--a complex, fully realized human being. With this picture in mind, anyone who admires Thoreau's life and work will view him with fresh eyes." --Shelf Awareness

"Sims offers intriguing sidelights and memorable details . . . [he] helps us to see Thoreau as a colorful, crotchety human being." --Washington Post

"Sims gracefully captures what he calls Thoreau's 'ecstatic response to nature.'" --Wall Street Journal

"[A] highly readable book . . . draws from an impressively broad range of early writings from those who knew Thoreau personally, and the result is indeed a very human 'Henry' as opposed to, as Sims notes, 'a marble bust of an icon." --CHOICE