Tending the Fire: Native Voices & Portraits

(Photographer) (Foreword by)
& 1 more
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Product Details

Price
$59.94
Publisher
University of New Mexico Press
Publish Date
Pages
248
Dimensions
9.1 X 11.2 X 1.0 inches | 3.2 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780826356451

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About the Author

Christopher Felver is an award-winning photographer and filmmaker who has published several books of photos of public figures, especially those in the arts, most notably those associated with beat literature.
Simon J. Ortiz is a Puebloan writer of the Acoma Pueblo tribe, and one of the key figures in the second wave of what has been called the Native American Renaissance. Ortiz has published many books of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction, but The People Shall Continue is his only book for young readers. His writing focuses on modern people's alienation from others, from oneself, and from one's environment--urging humanity to reconnect the wisdom of ancestral spirits and with Mother Earth. Ortiz lives in Tempe, Arizona.
Linda Hogan, a renowned Chickasaw poet, novelist, essayist, playwright, speaker, educator, and activist, served as a professor at the University of Colorado and is currently Writer in Residence for the Chickasaw Nation. Her 1990 novel, Mean Spirit, and poetry collection Rounding the Human Corners were considered as finalists for Pulitzer Prizes. Among the many honors garnered by Hogan's books are the Oklahoma Book Award, the Colorado Book Award, an American Book Award, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas. In addition to works offered through major publishing houses, Hogan also coauthored Chickasaw Press's inaugural publication in 2006, Chickasaw: Unconquered and Unconquerable. In 2007 the Chickasaw Nation inducted Linda Hogan into its Hall of Fame.

Reviews

"Felver's portraits, and excerpts from Native American writers, emphasize the interconnectedness of Native communities. . . . A compelling visual and literary introduction to indigenous American authors."--Foreword Reviews