Surrender

Available

Product Details

Price
$15.99  $14.71
Publisher
Mariner Books
Publish Date
Pages
224
Dimensions
5.2 X 7.9 X 0.7 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781328528520

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About the Author

RAY LORIGA is an author, screenwriter, and film director. Surrender, which won the Alfaguara Prize in Spain in 2017, is his third novel to be published in the United States. His previous, Tokyo Doesn't Love Us Anymore, received rave reviews in the New York Times, Washington Post, and elsewhere. His work has been translated into fourteen languages.

Reviews

WINNER OF THE ALFAGUARA PRIZE (SPAIN), 2017

"Ray Loriga is a fascinating cross between Marguerite Duras and Jim Thompson."
--Pedro Almodóvar

"[A] riveting, and original, achievement."
--WIRED, "13 Must-Read Books for Spring"

"Loriga envisions in this gripping tale an unsettling dystopia in which all secrets are forbidden... [His] chilling portent of the future will undoubtedly resonate with readers concerned about the erosion of privacy. This memorable page-turner will appeal to fans of Brave New World."
--Publishers Weekly

"[Surrender is] a Kafkaesque and Orwellian story about authority and collective manipulation, a parable on our societies exposed to the gaze and judgment of all. Through the use of a modest and thoughtful voice, with unexpected bursts of humor, the author constructs a luminous fable about exile, loss, paternity and attachment."
--Alfaguara Prize Winner Citation

"[Surrender's] climax packs abundant weight...this novel has plenty of power."
--Kirkus Reviews

"[A] contemplative dystopian story...With an allegorical tone, Spanish writer Loriga presents a spare novel that yields harsh realizations and a deeply felt perception of humanity."
--Booklist

"Loriga can be considered the originator of writing that moves away from Spanish realism, to mental monologue in a desolate landscape, as if taken from a Hopper painting, with protagonists whose only social nucleus, generally broken, is that of refined writing, of short paragraphs, that does not describe but rather goes, silently, like the tires of a car on a highway."
--La Vanguardia