Strange Weather in Tokyo

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Product Details

Price
$16.95  $15.59
Publisher
Counterpoint LLC
Publish Date
Pages
192
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.1 X 0.7 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781640090163
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Hiromi Kawakami was born in Tokyo in 1958. Her first book, God (Kamisama) was published in 1994. In 1996, she was awarded the Akutagawa Prize for Tread on a Snake (Hebi o fumu), and in 2001 she won the Tanizaki Prize for her novel Strange Weather in Tokyo (Sensei no kaban), which was an international bestseller. The book was short-listed for the 2012 Man Asian Literary Prize and the 2014 International Foreign Fiction Prize.

Allison Markin Powell is a translator, editor, and publishing consultant. In addition to Hiromi Kawakami's Strange Weather in Tokyo, The Nakano Thrift Shop, and The Ten Loves of Nishino, she has translated books by Osamu Dazai and Fuminori Nakamura, and her work has appeared in Words Without Borders and Granta, among other publications. She maintains the database japaneseliteratureinenglish.com.

Reviews

Praise for Strange Weather in Tokyo (previously published as The Briefcase)

"I'm hooked on [this] sentimental novel about the friendship, formed over late nights at a sake bar, between a Tokyo woman in her late thirties and her old high school teacher... I can only imagine what wizardry must have gone into Allison Markin Powell's translation." --Lorin Stein, The Paris Review Daily

"Simply and earnestly told, this is a profound exploration of human connection and the ways love can be found in surprising new places." --BuzzFeed

"A sweet and poignant story of love and loneliness . . . A beautiful introductory book to Kawakami's distinct style." --Book Riot

"In quiet, nature-infused prose that stresses both characters' solitude, Kawakami subtly captures the cyclic patterns of loneliness while weighing the definition of love." --Booklist

"In its love of the physical, sensual details of living, its emotional directness, and above all in the passion for food, this is somewhat reminiscent of Banana Yoshimoto's Kitchen." --INDEPENDENT, (UK)

"I love this book and its characters so much. It's the best." --Bryan Washington, author of Lot

"Each chapter of the book is like a haiku, incorporating seasonal references to the moon, mushroom picking and cherry blossoms. The chapters are whimsical and often melancholy, but humor is never far away.... It is a celebration of friendship, the ordinary and individuality and a rumination on intimacy, love and loneliness. I cannot recommend Strange Weather in Tokyo enough, which is also a testament to the translator who has skillfully retained the poetry and beauty of the original." --The Japan Society

"Strange Weather in Tokyo is a tender love story that drifts with the lightness of a leaf on a stream. Subtle and touching, this is a novel about loneliness, assuaged by an unlikely romance, and brought to life by one of Japan's most engaging contemporary writers." --Readings (Australia)

"A dream-like spell of a novel, full of humor, sadness, warmth and tremendous subtlety. I read this in one sitting and I think it will haunt me for a long time." --Amy Sackville