Stick Cat: Cats in the City

Tom Watson (Author)
Available

Description

Join Stick Cat and his incomparable sidekick Edith on another dangerous, epic, and hilarious rescue mission in Tom Watson's Stick Cat: Cats in the City!

With over-the-top fun and humor, this scrumptious story features Tom Watson's trademark laughs, adventure, and hilarious stick-figure drawings, perfect for fans of the Stick Dog, Big Nate, Timmy Failure, and Diary of a Wimpy Kid books.

Stick Cat is going somewhere he's never been before--his best friend Edith's apartment. It's got everything: donut crumbs in the sink, a fire escape, and a window with a great view of the big city.

While admiring the view, Stick Cat sees trouble. Hazel, the bagel maker, is in serious danger in the building across the alley. Stick Cat will use his smarts--and Edith's appetite--to devise a rescue plan. But can Hazel hang on long enough for this dynamic duo to save her?

Even reluctant readers gobble up the Stick Cat and Stick Dog books!

Product Details

Price
$12.99  $11.95
Publisher
HarperCollins
Publish Date
April 25, 2017
Pages
224
Dimensions
5.6 X 0.8 X 8.2 inches | 0.65 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780062411020

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About the Author

Tom Watson lives in Chicago with his wife, daughter, and son. He also has a dog, as you could probably guess. The dog is a Labrador-Newfoundland mix, who he says looks like a Labrador with a bad perm. He wanted to name the dog "Put Your Shirt On" (please don't ask why), but he was outvoted by his family. The dog's name is Shadow. Early in his career Tom worked in politics, including a stint as the chief speechwriter for the governor of Ohio. This experience helped him develop the unique, storytelling narrative style of the Stick Dog books. More important, Tom's time in politics made him realize a very important thing: kids are way smarter than adults. And it's a lot more fun and rewarding to write stories for them than to write speeches for grown-ups.