South in Black and White

McKay Jenkins (Author)
Available

Description

If the nation as a whole during the 1940s was halfway between the Great Depression of the 1930s and the postwar prosperity of the 1950s, the South found itself struggling through an additional transition, one bound up in an often violent reworking of its own sense of history and regional identity. Examining the changing nature of racial politics in the 1940s, McKay Jenkins measures its impact on white Southern literature, history, and culture.

Jenkins focuses on four white Southern writers--W. J. Cash, William Alexander Percy, Lillian Smith, and Carson McCullers--to show how they constructed images of race and race relations within works that professed to have little, if anything, to do with race. Sexual isolation further complicated these authors' struggles with issues of identity and repression, he argues, allowing them to occupy a space between the privilege of whiteness and the alienation of blackness. Although their views on race varied tremendously, these Southern writers' uneasy relationship with their own dominant racial group belies the idea that whiteness was an unchallenged, monolithic racial identity in the region.

Product Details

Price
$39.95
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Publish Date
September 20, 1999
Pages
232
Dimensions
5.82 X 0.62 X 9.3 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780807847770
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

McKay Jenkins holds degrees from Amherst College, Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism, and Princeton. He is the author of The Last Ridge, The White Death, and Bloody Falls of the Coppermine. A professor of English, journalism, and environmental humanities at the University of Delaware, McKay lives in Baltimore.

Reviews

"[This book] should be bought, discussed, argued about, and taught.

"Journal of Southern History""
An intelligent discussion of the way the subject of race has dominated white southern expression.

"The Journal of American History"
"He shows how issues of race are never that far from the surface in American books, and Southern ones in particular.

"Times Literary Supplement""
"This thoroughly researched book enters the contemporary literary and cultural discussion in an up-to-date, highly relevant fashion.

"Virginia Quarterly Review""
"Especially refreshing is the complexity of Jenkins's arguments, with their resistance to doctrinaire theoretical positions.

Louise Westling, University of Oregon"
รThis bookยจ should be bought, discussed, argued about, and taught.

"Journal of Southern History"
He shows how issues of race are never that far from the surface in American books, and Southern ones in particular.

"Times Literary Supplement"
This thoroughly researched book enters the contemporary literary and cultural discussion in an up-to-date, highly relevant fashion.

"Virginia Quarterly Review"
Especially refreshing is the complexity of Jenkins's arguments, with their resistance to doctrinaire theoretical positions.

Louise Westling, University of Oregon
[This book] should be bought, discussed, argued about, and taught.

"Journal of Southern History"