Snoopy's Christmas Surprise

Charles M. Schulz (Author) Jason Cooper (Adapted by)
& 1 more
Available

Description

Celebrate Christmas with Snoopy, Woodstock, and the rest of the Peanuts gang in this 8x8 storybook that comes with a sheet of Christmas stickers!

Snoopy is excited when his brother Spike writes and says he is coming for a visit. But then at the last minute Spike changes his mind because he can't afford a bus ticket. Snoopy is sad and the Peanuts gang tries their best to cheer him up. Linus offers him his blanket, Sally gives him a big hug, Charlie Brown brings him treats, but Snoopy is still miserable. That is until Lucy saves the day by using her advice booth money to buy Spike his ticket. It's a very merry Christmas for Snoopy (and everyone) after all!

(c) 2018 Peanuts Worldwide LLC

Product Details

Price
$5.99  $5.51
Publisher
Simon Spotlight
Publish Date
September 18, 2018
Pages
16
Dimensions
7.7 X 0.2 X 7.7 inches | 0.15 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781534421813

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About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922, in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course, and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post--as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts--and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate.) The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day--and the day before his last strip was published--having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand--an unmatched achievement in comics.