Skeletal Anatomy of the Newborn Primate

Timothy D. Smith (Author) Valerie B. DeLeon (Author)
& 1 more
Available

Description

Although much is known about the anatomy of adult primates, particularly chimpanzees, the same cannot be said for the anatomy of young primates, especially non-hominoid primates such as lemurs and marmosets. This is the first book dedicated to newborn skeletal and dental anatomy and how it varies across primate species, which is important for interpreting adult primate skeletal form, as well as for comprehending primate and human evolution. Structured according to anatomical regions, the book includes hundreds of detailed anatomical illustrations, a color atlas illustrating entire skeletons in representative taxa, and boxes at the end of each chapter providing further detail on key aspects covered in the main text. Whilst the book is primarily a guide to comparative anatomy, it also highlights the links between development and behavior. An indispensable resource for students and researchers in the fields of biological anthropology, anatomy, primatology, growth and development, dental biology, and veterinary medicine.

Product Details

Price
$110.00
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publish Date
May 28, 2020
Pages
328
Dimensions
7.6 X 9.8 X 0.8 inches | 2.1 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781107152694

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About the Author

Timothy D. Smith is Professor at the School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania. He has researched growth and development in primates and other mammals for over two decades, with a particular focus on the perinatal period. He is also an illustrator and has produced anatomical illustrations for numerous journal articles and books. He is currently an Associate Editor for The Anatomical Record.
Valerie B. DeLeon is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, University of Florida. She has studied craniofacial development and growth in humans, non-human primates, and other mammals for over twenty years. She currently serves as President-Elect of the American Association of Anatomists.
Christopher J. Vinyard is Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Northeast Ohio Medical University. He has studied mammalian craniofacial biology for two decades, with a special emphasis on feeding adaptations in primates. He is the co-editor of Primate Craniofacial Function and Biology (2008).