Siddhartha/The Dhammapada/The Buddha

Hermann Hesse (Author) Buddha (Author)
& 2 more
Available

Description


The name "Siddhartha" is often given to the Buddha himself--perhaps a clue to Hesse's aims contrasting the traditional legendary figure with his own conception.

This new edition of the classic Siddhartha includes The Dhammapada ("Path of Virtue"), the 423 verses attributed to the Buddha himself, which forms the essence of the ethics of Buddhist philosophy.

Product Details

Price
$14.95  $13.75
Publisher
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
September 28, 2009
Pages
174
Dimensions
5.2 X 0.45 X 7.98 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780811218504
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Hermann Hesse (1877-1962) was a German poet and novelist. He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1962. He was the author of works including Siddhartha, Steppenwolf, and Demian.
The Buddha (c. 5th to 4th century BC) was a philosopher, mendicant, meditator, spiritual teacher, and religious leader who lived in Ancient India. He is revered as the founder of the world religion of Buddhism. He taught for around 45 years and built a large following, both monastic and lay. The Buddha was born into an aristocratic family but eventually renounced lay life. According to Buddhist tradition, after several years of mendicancy, meditation, and asceticism, he awakened to understand the mechanism which keeps people trapped in the cycle of rebirth. The Buddha then traveled throughout the Ganges plain teaching and building a religious community. He taught a spiritual path that included ethical training and meditative practices.
Irving Babbitt (1865-1933) was an American academic and literary critic.
Hilda Rosner is an author and translator.

Reviews

Hermann Hesse is the greatest writer of the century.
Delight in Hesse signifies a new delight in human mysteries, in life's possibilities, in the power of the will and the pleasures of the imagination.
One could even hope that Hesse's readers are hungrily imbibing Siddhartha, and that they will be so wisely foolish as to live by it.