Sex Workers, Psychics, and Numbers Runners: Black Women in New York City's Underground Economy

Available

Product Details

Price
$33.60
Publisher
University of Illinois Press
Publish Date
Pages
280
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.1 X 0.9 inches | 1.1 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780252081668

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About the Author

LaShawn Harris is an assistant professor of history at Michigan State University.

Reviews

"Harris has written an important work--perhaps the most important on African American women in the underground economy. Sex Workers, Psychics, and Numbers Runners may well be a classic. It should be required reading for all interested in African American, criminal, social, urban, and women's histories, and other related disciplines."--Journal of American History

"This outstanding first monograph by historian Harris continues Deborah Gray White's 1987 call for historians to reclaim the voices of African American women lost in the margins... Highly Recommended."--Choice
"Sex Workers, Psychics, and Numbers Runners presents a clear-eyed view of the opportunities and dangers that characterized black women's presence in New York City's underbelly." --Palimpsest


"In Harris's beautifully written book, the stories of black women in New York who have been absent in historical narratives vividly come to life. Harris takes us on a fascinating journey of New York City unlike any we have ever seen."--Public Books
"This text goes a long way to articulating the major role that black women informal workers played in contributing to the wider American economy in the early twentieth century, and further challenging taken for granted conceptions of black womanhood, and gender role expectations."--Ethnic and Racial Studies
"Harris shows how these women skillfully created unique spaces to participate in the city's informal economy. Her close attention to these women's lives and labors during the twentieth century shed light on the perseverance, ingenuity and creativity of Black women." -Keisha N. Blain, Ms.