Robin Schwartz: Amelia and the Animals

Donna Gustafson (Text by (Art/Photo Books)) Robin Schwartz (Photographer)
& 1 more
Available

Product Details

Price
$39.95  $36.75
Publisher
Aperture
Publish Date
October 31, 2014
Pages
144
Dimensions
8.91 X 11.09 X 0.7 inches | 2.22 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781597112789

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About the Author

Donna Gustafson is curator of American art and Mellon Director for Academic Programs at the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University and a member of the graduate faculty in Art History.
Robin Schwartz earned an MFA in photography from Pratt Institute, and her photographs are held in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art, both New York; Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Brooklyn Museum; Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virginia; Bibliothรจque Nationale, Paris; and Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany. She is an assistant professor of photography at William Paterson University and lives in New Jersey with her husband, Robert Forman, daughter, Amelia, and five companion animals.
Amelia Paul Forman is a high schooler, animal lover, and aspiring biologist. She writes, draws, photographs, and travels.

Reviews

On a lighter note, Amelia and the Animals is a delightful collection of photographs by American photographer Robin Schwartz. It depicts her daughter Amelia communing with a variety of species ranging from bald sphinx like cats to the more exotic tiger cub. There seems nothing unusual in seeing Amelia perched in an elephant's trunk or seemingly in conversation with a group of kangaroos. She is nature's child and seems relaxed with her animal companions. Schwartz photographs are otherworldly, artfully composed and Amelia's quiet, wistful expression and abundance of hair feel almost PreRaphaelite.--Cheryl Newman "Dirty Books "
If you buy only one thing this month, make it Robin Schwartz's new book, Amelia and the Animals. The images of her growing daughter with animals big and small is a powerful meditation on fantasy and reality in the natural world.--The Editors "Smallish Magazine "
When potrait photographer Robin Schwartz took her 3-year-old daughter to the circus, she never expected the toddler to fall in love. But once Amelia met a baby chimp named Ricky, "the two of them could not stop hugging," says Schwartz who captured the mutual affection with her camera. That encounter inspired Schwartz to continue photographing the ways her daughter now 15, bonds with animals. The pair have become creative partners, dreaming up whimsical sweet potraits with all kinds of furry friends: Amelia leading the way for six llamas, curling up among kangaroos, cuddling with a camel, sitting next to a wallaby at a kitchen table. The 12-year project is now a book, Amelia and the Animals. "We try to create a world where there is no line between humans and animals," says Schwartz.--Abigail Libers "O Magazine "
Both mother and daughter have always felt a strong connection with animals, and that's what Schwartz means to show in her new book, Amelia & the Animals, which will be released next month.--Gabrielle Plucknette "NYmag.com, Science of Us "
Robin Schwartz's images of animals have appeared in museum and galleries around the world, and her daughter Amelia has spent her lifetime among the animals her mother has photographed.--Phil Bicker "TIME Lightbox "
Rickard is following that work up with a new book called "N.A.," where he continues to mine the Internet for views of America that are anything but idyllic. This time, he snatches frame grabs from videos that were made on cell phones and uploaded to YouTube.

The book is not a photojournalistic document -- the lack of captions and context asks us to create our own narratives. The printed text in the book includes a poem created using comments from YouTube. And the low resolution of the frame grabs mostly protects the identities of the subjects and gives the visceral imagery an impressionistic gloss.--Rebecca Horne "CNN Living "