Robert Frank: The Americans

Robert Frank (Photographer) Jack Kerouac (Introduction by)
Available

Description

First published in France in 1958, then in the United States in 1959, Robert Frank's The Americans changed the course of twentieth-century photography. In 83 photographs, Frank looked beneath the surface of American life to reveal a people plagued by racism, ill-served by their politicians and rendered numb by a rapidly expanding culture of consumption. Yet he also found novel areas of beauty in simple, overlooked corners of American life. And it was not just Frank's subject matter--cars, jukeboxes and even the road itself--that redefined the icons of America; it was also his seemingly intuitive, immediate, off-kilter style, as well as his method of brilliantly linking his photographs together thematically, conceptually, formally and linguistically, that made The Americans so innovative. More of an ode or a poem than a literal document, the book is as powerful and provocative today as it was 56 years ago.--Lisa Contag "Artinfo"

Product Details

Price
$40.00  $36.80
Publisher
Steidl
Publish Date
May 15, 2008
Pages
180
Dimensions
8.5 X 1.0 X 7.5 inches | 1.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9783865215840

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About the Author

Jack Kerouac was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1922, the youngest of three children in a Franco-American family. He attended local Catholic and public schools and won a football scholarship to Columbia University in New York City, where he first met Neal Cassady, Allen Ginsberg, and William S. Burroughs. He quit school in his sophomore year after a dispute with his football coach. In 1947, enthused by bebop, the rebel attitude of his friends and the throng of hobos, drug addicts and hustlers he encountered in New York, he decided to discover America and hitchhike across the country. His writing was openly autobiographical and he developed a style he referred to as 'spontaneous prose' which he used to record the experiences. His first novel, The Town and the City, appeared in 1950, but it was On the Road, first published in 1957 and memorializing his adventures with Neal Cassady, that epitomized to the world what became known as the Beat Generation, and made Kerouac one of the most controversial and best-known writers of his time. Publication of his many other books followed, among them The Dharma Bums, The Subterraneans, and Big Sur. He died in St. Petersburg, Florida, in 1969, at the age of forty-seven.

Reviews

His work is revolutionary in showing an America that was not seen, but also creating a way of seeing in photography that was new, powerful and charged.--Ken Light "San Francisco Chronicle "
...Robert Frank changed history with the 83 images that appeared in his stark breakthrough "The Americans.--Sam Whiting "SFGate "
That is the miracle of great socially committed art: It addresses our sources of deepest unease, helps us to confront what we cannot organize or explain by making all of it unforgettable.--Nicholas Dawidoff "The New York Times Magazine "
The exhibition is as comprehensive as it is ephemeral featuring a wealth of photographs, all of Frank's books since 1947, and his films that he began focusing on in the early 1960s.--Lisa Contag "Artinfo "
The photographs from his seminal book The Americans, which took a critical look at our nation's life in the 1950s, are timeless. His work continues to inspire new generations to follow his path to see what is invisible in America.--L'Oeil de la Photographie
[Frank] pioneered a whole new subject matter that we [now] define as icons: cars, jukeboxes, even the road itself.--Scott Indrisek "Artsy "
The Americans challenged the presiding midcentury formula for photojournalism. Mr. Frank's photographs -- of lone individuals, teenage couples, groups at funerals and odd spoors of cultural life -- were cinematic, immediate, off-kilter and grainy, like early television transmissions of the period.--Philip Gefter "New York Times "