Repast: Tea, Lunch, Cocktails

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Product Details

Price
$20.00
Publisher
Graywolf Press
Publish Date
Pages
206
Dimensions
7.4 X 0.6 X 9.0 inches | 0.95 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781555976965
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

D. A. Powell is the author of five collections of poetry, including "Useless Landscape, or A Guide for Boys," winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, and "Chronic," winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. He lives in San Francisco, California.

Reviews

"Powell's long, stuttering line helps his extravagant imagination encompass the practical troubles long illness entails. No accessible poet of his generation is half as original, and no poet as original is this accessible. With his open-secret sexiness, his confident collage effects, and his grave subjects, Powell could reach far beyond the segmented audiences most poets now expect: poems like his can open up new fields, where fascinated readers might roam or graze." --Stephen Burt, "The New York Times Book Review
"
"A triptych of strangely beautiful poems kindled by the poet's riposte to the AIDS pandemic. Powell has developed an unmistakable style, the world of which allows him to be as literal or transformative--and as narrative or associative--as he needs to be." --"American Poet
"
"Powell's work shows canonical influence--Williams, cummings, H. D., and Eliot most notably--and yet maintains its own predominant voice, that of a truth teller who metes out accuracy with a fierce but well-spoken intelligence." --"BOMB"

Powell's long, stuttering line helps his extravagant imagination encompass the practical troubles long illness entails. No accessible poet of his generation is half as original, and no poet as original is this accessible. With his open-secret sexiness, his confident collage effects, and his grave subjects, Powell could reach far beyond the segmented audiences most poets now expect: poems like his can open up new fields, where fascinated readers might roam or graze. "Stephen Burt, The New York Times Book Review"

A triptych of strangely beautiful poems kindled by the poet's riposte to the AIDS pandemic. Powell has developed an unmistakable style, the world of which allows him to be as literal or transformative--and as narrative or associative--as he needs to be. "American Poet"

Powell's work shows canonical influence--Williams, cummings, H. D., and Eliot most notably--and yet maintains its own predominant voice, that of a truth teller who metes out accuracy with a fierce but well-spoken intelligence. "BOMB""

"Powell's long, stuttering line helps his extravagant imagination encompass the practical troubles long illness entails. No accessible poet of his generation is half as original, and no poet as original is this accessible. With his open-secret sexiness, his confident collage effects, and his grave subjects, Powell could reach far beyond the segmented audiences most poets now expect: poems like his can open up new fields, where fascinated readers might roam or graze." --Stephen Burt, The New York Times Book Review

"A triptych of strangely beautiful poems kindled by the poet's riposte to the AIDS pandemic. Powell has developed an unmistakable style, the world of which allows him to be as literal or transformative--and as narrative or associative--as he needs to be." --American Poet

"Powell's work shows canonical influence--Williams, cummings, H. D., and Eliot most notably--and yet maintains its own predominant voice, that of a truth teller who metes out accuracy with a fierce but well-spoken intelligence." --BOMB