Rag

(Author)
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Product Details

Price
$17.95
Publisher
Omnidawn
Publish Date
Pages
126
Dimensions
5.9 X 0.5 X 8.9 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781890650933
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

JULIE CARR is the author of four books of poetry, including 100 Notes on Violence (Sawtooth Prize) and Sarah--Of Fragments and Lines (National Poetry Series). Her critical work Surface Tension: Ruptural Time and the Poetics of Desire in Late Victorian Poetry was published in 2013. She lives in Denver, teaches at University of Colorado, Boulder and is Co-publisher of Counterpath Press.

Reviews

Publishers Weekly"
The Rumpus"
Boston Review"
Vouched Books"
Carr s language is at once immediate and mysterious, Present tense owns such pure confidence on the porch. She juxtaposes impressionistic prose passages and sparse single lines, layering and accumulating a catalogue of energies. Publishers Weekly"
Carr details the experience of primarily female characters through the lens: A woman might be a kind of postproduction medium, or a filter through which the desires of the ground are felt (42). But it may be that Carr s ultimate concern is a more genderless subjectivity, the constructedness of all those faces. As goes the imagined monologue of one of the actors from the director s perspective, consider my identity, she might say (59). With this statement hypothetical, projected, filtered Carr invites her readership to consider the extent of anyone s agency in a socially proscribed reality. Benjamin Landry, The Rumpus"
"Rag, Julie Carr s fifth book of poetry, is a streaming collection of untitled prose and poem segments. Lines, images, and fragments circulate, alternately recalling and anticipating their reappearance in longer passages. In this continual flux and flow, the book takes on the form and force of a body. But it is not a body in the sense of a body of work, which implies the presence of a remote authorial intelligence controlling an accumulation of matter. Rag belies these traces of the dualist schism between mind and body, beginning with the way its streaming elements seem to grow into each other, achieving in their combination a living intelligence. Rag, in this sense, is an organism, composed of multiple interacting systems sensing, reacting, circulating, digesting, rejecting, signaling." Karinne Keithley Syers, Boston Review"
Carr forfeits a cohesive self to see the larger strictures such as gender, race, narrative, and memory inside which a self is structured. Vouched Books"
The central concern of Rag is violence against women and girls as it surfaces in film, fairy tale, daily life, the news. Against that, I wanted to record intimacies of all kinds as a response, maybe an answer, to such threat. Poetry Society of America"
"Rag, Julie Carr's fifth book of poetry, is a streaming collection of untitled prose and poem segments. Lines, images, and fragments circulate, alternately recalling and anticipating their reappearance in longer passages. In this continual flux and flow, the book takes on the form and force of a body. But it is not a body in the sense of "a body of work," which implies the presence of a remote authorial intelligence controlling an accumulation of matter. Rag belies these traces of the dualist schism between mind and body, beginning with the way its streaming elements seem to grow into each other, achieving in their combination a living intelligence. Rag, in this sense, is an organism, composed of multiple interacting systems--sensing, reacting, circulating, digesting, rejecting, signaling."--Karinne Keithley Syers, Boston Review
"The central concern of Rag is violence against women and girls as it surfaces in film, fairy tale, daily life, the news. Against that, I wanted to record intimacies of all kinds...as a response, maybe an answer, to such threat."--Poetry Society of America
Carr's language is at once immediate and mysterious, "Present tense owns such pure confidence on the porch." She juxtaposes impressionistic prose passages and sparse single lines, layering and accumulating a catalogue of energies.-- "Publishers Weekly" (1/1/2014 12:00:00 AM)
"Carr details the experience of primarily female characters through the lens: "A woman might be a kind of postproduction medium, or a filter through which the desires of the ground are felt" (42). But it may be that Carr's ultimate concern is a more genderless subjectivity, the constructedness of all those faces. As goes the imagined monologue of one of the actors from the director's perspective, "consider my identity, she might say" (59). With this statement--hypothetical, projected, filtered--Carr invites her readership to consider the extent of anyone's agency in a socially proscribed reality."--Benjamin Landry "The Rumpus" (1/1/2014 12:00:00 AM)
Rag, Julie Carr's fifth book of poetry, is a streaming collection of untitled prose and poem segments. Lines, images, and fragments circulate, alternately recalling and anticipating their reappearance in longer passages. In this continual flux and flow, the book takes on the form and force of a body. But it is not a body in the sense of "a body of work," which implies the presence of a remote authorial intelligence controlling an accumulation of matter. Rag belies these traces of the dualist schism between mind and body, beginning with the way its streaming elements seem to grow into each other, achieving in their combination a living intelligence. Rag, in this sense, is an organism, composed of multiple interacting systems--sensing, reacting, circulating, digesting, rejecting, signaling.--Karinne Keithley Syers "Boston Review" (1/1/2014 12:00:00 AM)
"Carr forfeits a cohesive self to see the larger strictures--such as gender, race, narrative, and memory--inside which a self is structured."--Karinne Keithley Syers "Vouched Books" (1/1/2015 12:00:00 AM)