Radioactive!: How Irène Curie and Lise Meitner Revolutionized Science and Changed the World

Available

Product Details

Price
$10.95  $10.07
Publisher
Algonquin Young Readers
Publish Date
February 20, 2018
Pages
240
Dimensions
5.9 X 8.9 X 0.6 inches | 0.65 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781616206413

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Winifred Conkling is an award-winning author of fiction and nonfiction for young readers, including Passenger on the Pearl, Radioactive!, Votes for Women!, and the middle-grade novel Sylvia & Aki. You can find her online at winifredconkling.com.

Reviews

"With a great sense of storytelling, author Winifred Conkling introduces two physicists whose major discoveries also brought about more equality and anti-war awareness in the sciences . . . Radioactive! addresses serious topics like the advent of chemical and atomic warfare and the Nazi rise to power, and leaves biography buffs wanting to know more in the best way." --BUST Magazine

"A thorough and engaging study of two female scientists worth their weight in radium." --Booklist, starred review

"Luminous and fascinating, [Radioactive!] recounts the lives and amazing findings of chemist (and daughter of [Marie] Curie) Irène Joliot-Curie, codiscoverer of artificial radiation, and physicist Lise Meitner, codiscoverer of nuclear fission. This title would make a lovely companion to Steve Sheinkin's Bomb: The Race to Build--and Steal--the World's Most Dangerous Weapon." --School Library Journal

"In this thorough and clear dual biography, Conkling (Passenger on the Pearl) profiles two 20th-century scientists whose contributions facilitated the creation of the atomic bomb--to their horror. Though Lise Meitner (1878-1968) and Irène Curie (1897-1956) shared an idealistic and passionate devotion to physics, they were often rivals and never worked collaboratively...Both highly educated women struggled against chauvinist attitudes: Curie's efforts to join the French Academy of Science were repeatedly turned down, while Meitner never received a Nobel Prize despite 15 nominations. Conkling successfully redresses that lack of recognition here. A glossary, time line, and extensive Who's Who section provide additional context, along with explanatory sidebars and b&w photos. " --Publishers Weekly