Race to Incarcerate: A Graphic Retelling

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Product Details

Price
$17.95  $16.51
Publisher
New Press
Publish Date
Pages
128
Dimensions
7.9 X 0.6 X 9.8 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781595585417
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Sabrina Jones is the author of Isadora Duncan: A Graphic Biography and a contributor to World War 3 Illustrated, Wobblies!, The Real Cost of Prisons, Studs Terkel's Working (The New Press), FDR and the New Deal for Beginners, Yiddishkeit, and Radical Jesus. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. Marc Mauer is the executive director of The Sentencing Project in Washington, D.C. He is the author of Race to Incarcerate, a semifinalist for the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award, and the co-editor, with Meda Chesney-Lind, of Invisible Punishment (both available from The New Press). He lives in the Washington, D.C., area. Michelle Alexander is the author of the New York Times bestseller The New Jim Crow.

Reviews

"Its political and cultural immediacy makes this an excellent title for adults interested in social issues as well as for college students, teens, and tweens. It also serves as a bridge to Mauer's original edition [first published in 1999], since skillful black-and-white visuals from Jones add clarity and vividness to complex issues."
--"Library Journal"
"Jones's gritty illustrations punctuate Mauer's main points. The result is a searing indictment of divisive policies and empty rhetoric. Throughout the short narrative, it is obvious that Mauer and Jones still believe that change can prevail--and that if politicians would only remove the blinders and make much needed investments toward the future, they would see that continued incarceration does nothing to heal the demographic divide."
"Shelf Awareness"

"Its political and cultural immediacy makes this an excellent title for adults interested in social issues as well as for college students, teens, and tweens. It also serves as a bridge to Mauer's original edition [first published in 1999], since skillful black-and-white visuals from Jones add clarity and vividness to complex issues."
--"Library Journal"

Selected for the Young Adult Library Services Association's 2014 Great Graphic Novels for Teens List
"Jones's gritty illustrations punctuate Mauer's main points. The result is a searing indictment of divisive policies and empty rhetoric. Throughout the short narrative, it is obvious that Mauer and Jones still believe that change can prevail--and that if politicians would only remove the blinders and make much needed investments toward the future, they would see that continued incarceration does nothing to heal the demographic divide."
"Shelf Awareness"
"Its political and cultural immediacy makes this an excellent title for adults interested in social issues as well as for college students, teens, and tweens. It also serves as a bridge to Mauer's original edition [first published in 1999], since skillful black-and-white visuals from Jones add clarity and vividness to complex issues."
--"Library Journal"

Selected for the Young Adult Library Services Association's 2014 Great Graphic Novels for Teens List

"Jones's gritty illustrations punctuate Mauer's main points. The result is a searing indictment of divisive policies and empty rhetoric. Throughout the short narrative, it is obvious that Mauer and Jones still believe that change can prevail--and that if politicians would only remove the blinders and make much needed investments toward the future, they would see that continued incarceration does nothing to heal the demographic divide."
Shelf Awareness

"Its political and cultural immediacy makes this an excellent title for adults interested in social issues as well as for college students, teens, and tweens. It also serves as a bridge to Mauer's original edition [first published in 1999], since skillful black-and-white visuals from Jones add clarity and vividness to complex issues."
--Library Journal