Queer Times, Black Futures

Kara Keeling (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$106.80
Publisher
New York University Press
Publish Date
April 16, 2019
Pages
288
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.0 X 0.81 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780814748329

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About the Author

Kara Keeling is Associate Professor of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago. Keeling is the author of The Witch's Flight: The Cinematic, the Black Femme, and the Image of Common Sense (2007) and the co-editor (with Josh Kun) of a selection of writings about sound and American Studies entitled Sound Clash: Listening to American Studies, and (with Colin MacCabe and Cornel West) of European Pedigrees/African Contagions: Racist Traces and Other Writing, a selection of writings by the late James A. Snead.

Reviews

"Just when the world seems to be collapsing, Queer Times, Black Futures guides us towards an anti-fragile future that exists here and now. The key? Embracing and holding in tension: Afro-futurist freedom dreams, the queer temporalities that animate Black Swans, and the radical refusal and opacity of Herman Melville's Bartleby and Eduoard Glissant's philosophy. If we haven't realized the possibilities that lie waiting in the present, its because the frame of black experience has not yet registered. Moving seamlessly from James Snead to Sun Ra, from Gilbert Simondon to Beth Coleman, Audre Lorde to Gilles Deleuze, Keeling helps us imagine the (im)possible. Stop reading this blurb and start reading this book. Now."--Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, author of Updating to Remain the Same
"Not satisfied to leave readers in the abyss of endless critique, Keeling is concerned with alternative futures and the ethical imagination of 'the time after the future.' Queer Times, Black Futures is masterful--deeply engaging, wide ranging, carefully researched, and creative in its use of allegory to demonstrate the potential and effect of opacity for black futures and possibilities."--Herman Gray, Emeritus Professor, UC Santa Cruz