Prague Pictures: Portraits of a City

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Product Details

Price
$18.00
Publisher
Bloomsbury USA
Publish Date
Pages
256
Dimensions
5.38 X 0.81 X 8.06 inches | 0.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781632863744
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland, in 1945. He is the author of twenty-five novels, some of them under the pen name Benjamin Black, and his acclaimed works include The Book of Evidence, shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, and The Sea, which won the prize in 2005. He has also been awarded the Franz Kafka Prize, among others. Banville lives in Dublin.

Reviews

"Ireland's finest contemporary novelist."
"Mr. Banville is that rare writer who can pack all five senses into one declarative sentence."
"As remarkable a literary voice as any to come out of Ireland, Joyce and Beckett notwithstanding."
Praise for John Banville:
"Ireland's finest contemporary novelist."-"The Economist"
"Mr. Banville is that rare writer who can pack all five senses into one declarative sentence."-"Wall Street Journal"
"As remarkable a literary voice as any to come out of Ireland, Joyce and Beckett notwithstanding."-"San Francisco Chronicle"
"What is unusual-defiantly and therefore perhaps gloriously so-about Banville...is the prose: poetic, sensuous, revelatory."-"New York Review of Books"

"Ireland''s finest contemporary novelist."
"What is unusual-defiantly and therefore perhaps gloriously so-about Banville.is the prose: poetic, sensuous, revelatory."
Praise for John Banville: "Ireland's finest contemporary novelist."-"The Economist""Mr. Banville is that rare writer who can pack all five senses into one declarative sentence."-"Wall Street Journal""As remarkable a literary voice as any to come out of Ireland, Joyce and Beckett notwithstanding."-"San Francisco Chronicle""What is unusual-defiantly and therefore perhaps gloriously so-about Banville...is the prose: poetic, sensuous, revelatory."-"New York Review of Books"
Praise for John Banville:

"Ireland's finest contemporary novelist."-"The Economist"

"Mr. Banville is that rare writer who can pack all five senses into one declarative sentence."-"Wall Street Journal"

"As remarkable a literary voice as any to come out of Ireland, Joyce and Beckett notwithstanding."-"San Francisco Chronicle"

"What is unusual-defiantly and therefore perhaps gloriously so-about Banville...is the prose: poetic, sensuous, revelatory."-"New York Review of Books"

When he was younger, Banville notes, he believed that really to get under the skin of a city one had to fall in love there. Prague, promiscuous and secretive, appears to have offered him another possibility. To understand a little more of himself, he first had to fall in love with a city.
Each anecdote, each site, each person recollected in memory is wonderfully evocative of the place. This is a beautiful book, lovely to hold and admire.

"Ireland's finest contemporary novelist." --"The Economist"

"Mr. Banville is that rare writer who can pack all five senses into one declarative sentence." --"The Wall Street Journal"

"As remarkable a literary voice as any to come out of Ireland, Joyce and Beckett notwithstanding." --"The San Francisco Chronicle"

"When he was younger, Banville notes, he believed that really to get under the skin of a city one had to fall in love there. Prague, promiscuous and secretive, appears to have offered him another possibility. To understand a little more of himself, he first had to fall in love with a city." --"The Guardian"

"Each anecdote, each site, each person recollected in memory is wonderfully evocative of the place. This is a beautiful book, lovely to hold and admire." --"Washington Times"

Ireland's finest contemporary novelist. "The Economist"

Mr. Banville is that rare writer who can pack all five senses into one declarative sentence. "The Wall Street Journal"

As remarkable a literary voice as any to come out of Ireland, Joyce and Beckett notwithstanding. "The San Francisco Chronicle"

When he was younger, Banville notes, he believed that really to get under the skin of a city one had to fall in love there. Prague, promiscuous and secretive, appears to have offered him another possibility. To understand a little more of himself, he first had to fall in love with a city. "The Guardian"

Each anecdote, each site, each person recollected in memory is wonderfully evocative of the place. This is a beautiful book, lovely to hold and admire. "Washington Times""

Ireland's finest contemporary novelist. The Economist

Mr. Banville is that rare writer who can pack all five senses into one declarative sentence. The Wall Street Journal

As remarkable a literary voice as any to come out of Ireland, Joyce and Beckett notwithstanding. The San Francisco Chronicle

When he was younger, Banville notes, he believed that really to get under the skin of a city one had to fall in love there. Prague, promiscuous and secretive, appears to have offered him another possibility. To understand a little more of himself, he first had to fall in love with a city. The Guardian

Each anecdote, each site, each person recollected in memory is wonderfully evocative of the place. This is a beautiful book, lovely to hold and admire. Washington Times

"

"Ireland's finest contemporary novelist." --The Economist

"Mr. Banville is that rare writer who can pack all five senses into one declarative sentence." --The Wall Street Journal

"As remarkable a literary voice as any to come out of Ireland, Joyce and Beckett notwithstanding." --The San Francisco Chronicle

"When he was younger, Banville notes, he believed that really to get under the skin of a city one had to fall in love there. Prague, promiscuous and secretive, appears to have offered him another possibility. To understand a little more of himself, he first had to fall in love with a city." --The Guardian

"Each anecdote, each site, each person recollected in memory is wonderfully evocative of the place. This is a beautiful book, lovely to hold and admire." --Washington Times