Possibility: Essays Against Despair

Available

Product Details

Price
$15.95  $14.83
Publisher
Sarabande Books
Publish Date
Pages
140
Dimensions
5.4 X 0.6 X 8.4 inches | 0.45 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781936747542
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Patricia Vigderman is the author of The Memory Palace of Isabella Stewart Gardner (Sarabande Books, 2007), bringing the world of a century-old Boston museum and its eccentric founder into harmony with present reality. Other efforts to reconcile life's discordant notes have led her to the ruined monuments of antiquity and its beautiful salvaged remnants, to an unexpected love affair with film, and into the endlessly unfolding mysteries of nature, language, art, and love. In 2010 she was a Literature Fellow at the Liguria Center for the Arts and Humanities in Bogliasco, Italy. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Gambier, Ohio, where she teaches in the English department at Kenyon College.

Reviews

"Though the book's title might resemble that of a self-help book, the essays in Vigderman's collection dwell not on despair, but on the project of translating chaotic experience into art or memory.... She is enthusiastic about beautiful language and new words--and her writing, lyrical and graceful, shows it."
--Publishers Weekly

"Vigderman specializes in elliptical, epigrammatic insight that makes connections that readers might not otherwise perceive. Most of the essays (many of them little longer than a page or two) were published independently, and all can stand on their own, but the author has provided a conceptual framework and thread of continuity as she groups them into four parts, moving from "Internal Conversations" to "The Measure of Grief " in the opening and two most compelling sections.... Frequent illumination within the density of compression, as the writer challenges readers to determine what they're thinking and feeling about what she's thinking and feeling."
--Kirkus Reviews