Plays 1682-1696: Volume 4, the Plays 1682-1696

Available

Product Details

Price
$120.00
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publish Date
Pages
954
Dimensions
7.7 X 9.2 X 1.9 inches | 3.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781108840743

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Aphra Behn (c.1640-89), or Astrea, was a poet, author and playwright, and is often cited as being one of the leading lights of the Restoration period. She is remembered today as being one of the first English women to earn a living with her pen, as well as for her work as a spy for Charles II. Her best-known works today are a Restoration drama, The Rover, and Oroonoko, or, The Royal Slave, a short work of fiction.
Alan James Hogarth is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Leicester. Working with Mel Evans, and using the latest techniques in computational stylometry, he has investigated the authorship of drama, poetry, prose and letters traditionally attributed to Behn. He has also been involved with the computational aspects of the Thomas Nashe project, and contributed to Visualising English Print, building and running experiments on a corpus of early-modern scientific texts.
Rachel Adcock is a Lecturer in English in the Department of English and Drama, Loughborough University
Kate Aughterson is Principal Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Brighton, and the author of a number of books on gender and performance in the early modern period, including Aphra Behn: The Comedies (2003). She is general editor of the Intellect Publishing series on Performance and Communities.
Anita Pacheco is an Honorary Associate in the Department of English at the Open University. She is the author of Coriolanus (Writers and their Work series, 2007) and the editor of A Companion to Early Modern Women's Writing (2002). She has written extensively on Aphra Behn's works, focussing in particular on their political meanings and their connection with freethinking.