Pinstripes & Pearls: The Women of the Harvard Law Class of '64 Who Forged an Old Girl Network and Paved the Way for Future Generations

Judith Richards Hope (Author) Kathleen Sullivan (Afterword by)
& 1 more
Available

Product Details

Price
$21.95
Publisher
Scribner Book Company
Publish Date
August 01, 2007
Pages
320
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.0 X 0.73 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781416575252
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Judith Richards Hope became the first female associate director of the White House Domestic Council in 1975. In 1981, she cofounded the Washington office of the Paul, Hastings law firm, where she still practices. She was the firm's first female partner and the first female executive committee member. In 1988, she was the first woman elected to the Union Pacific board.

In 1989, she became the first woman named to the Harvard Corporation, the university's senior governing board. Currently, she is on the board of the Thyssen-Krupp Budd Company, General Mills, Inc., Russell Reynolds Associates, Inc., and Union Pacific Corporation. Ms. Hope has taught law at Pepperdine, Georgetown, the University of Richmond, and Harvard. She lives in Washington, D.C., and Rappahannock County, Virginia.

Reviews

Charles Fried

Beneficial Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and author of "Right and Wrong" and "Contract as Promise"

A tough and tender look at how we were, how we are, and how we got from one to the other. Fascinating for those who have made the journey, this book has lessons for those who haven't had to.
Judith Areen

Dean, Georgetown University Law Center, and author of "Cases and Materials on Family Law"

This book is a must-read for women considering law school and for those who have already graduated. These women faced daunting barriers and personal hardship, yet they persevered. Their stories reveal the good news that it is possible to find our way through the pain of discrimination with humor rather than self-pity, and joy rather than bitterness.
Andrea Mitchell

Chief foreign correspondent, NBC News, and trustee, University of Pennsylvania

"Pinstripes & Pearls" is both a poignant history of the struggles of the women in the Harvard Law School class of 1964 and an eye-opening read for new generations of women trying to navigate their professional and personal worlds. One of the enduring lessons is how reinforcing and supportive these women are to each other, against obstacles that today's graduates would find overwhelming. This account is an important history of a critical time in America as well as a unique testimony to one woman's intelligence and grit.
Lynne Cheney

Author of "America: A Patriotic Primer"

The women in Harvard Law's class of 1964 were pioneers, and Judith Richards Hope has done us all a favor by recording their lives. She sets forth their stories in fascinating detail, from the early sense of discontent that these women felt for the role society had assigned them, to the matter-of-fact ways in which they dealt with the sexist worlds of law school and the legal profession. As Hope tells it, these women were not complainers. They didn't sue and they didn't march. Instead, they coolly measured the obstacles they faced and tried to surmount them, usually successfully, but not always. Hope's honest account of the conflicts these bright women faced as they tried to balance professional and personal lives speaks eloquently to the challenges that young women professionals still face today.
Charles Fried Beneficial Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, and author of "Right and Wrong" and "Contract as Promise" A tough and tender look at how we were, how we are, and how we got from one to the other. Fascinating for those who have made the journey, this book has lessons for those who haven't had to.
Andrea Mitchell Chief foreign correspondent, NBC News, and trustee, University of Pennsylvania "Pinstripes & Pearls" is both a poignant history of the struggles of the women in the Harvard Law School class of 1964 and an eye-opening read for new generations of women trying to navigate their professional and personal worlds. One of the enduring lessons is how reinforcing and supportive these women are to each other, against obstacles that today's graduates would find overwhelming. This account is an important history of a critical time in America as well as a unique testimony to one woman's intelligence and grit.
Lynne Cheney Author of "America: A Patriotic Primer" The women in Harvard Law's class of 1964 were pioneers, and Judith Richards Hope has done us all a favor by recording their lives. She sets forth their stories in fascinating detail, from the early sense of discontent that these women felt for the role society had assigned them, to the matter-of-fact ways in which they dealt with the sexist worlds of law school and the legal profession. As Hope tells it, these women were not complainers. They didn't sue and they didn't march. Instead, they coolly measured the obstacles they faced and tried to surmount them, usually successfully, but not always. Hope's honest account of the conflicts these bright women faced as they tried to balance professional and personal lives speaks eloquently to the challenges that young women professionals still face today.
Judith Areen Dean, Georgetown University Law Center, and author of "Cases and Materials on Family Law" This book is a must-read for women considering law school and for those who have already graduated. These women faced daunting barriers and personal hardship, yet they persevered. Their stories reveal the good news that it is possible to find our way through the pain of discrimination with humor rather than self-pity, and joy rather than bitterness.