The Oxford Handbook of Dance and Politics

Rebekah J. Kowal (Editor) Gerald Siegmund (Editor)
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Product Details

Price
$60.00
Publisher
Oxford University Press, USA
Publish Date
August 01, 2019
Pages
652
Dimensions
6.6 X 9.4 X 1.5 inches | 2.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780190052966

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About the Author

Rebekah Kowal is Associate Professor of Dance at The University of Iowa where she teaches courses in dance history and theory. Her first book, How to Do Things with Dance: Performing Change in Postwar America (Wesleyan University Press, 2010) investigates how moving bodies are compelling agents of social, cultural and political change. Her current project assesses the impact of postwar global dance performance on American concert dance formations and in the context of U.S. foreign relations, immigration and trade policies, and the politics of race, ethnicity, and citizenship. Gerald Siegmund is Professor of Applied Theatre Studies at the University of Giessen, Germany where he teaches courses in theatre and dance history, theory, and aesthetics. He has published widely on contemporary dance and theatre. Amongst his publications are William Forsythe - Denken in Bewegung (Henschel Verlag, 2004) and Dance, Politics, and Co-Immunity (together with Stefan HοΏ½lscher, Diaphanes 2013). Randy Martin (1957-2015) was Professor of Art and Public Policy at New York University and founder of the graduate program in arts politics. He published many books as author or editor, including The Financialization of Daily Life and Under New Management: Universities, Administrative Labor and the Professional Turn; An Empire of Indifference; Critical Moves and On Your Marx. An edited volume is forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press: Derivatives and the Wealth of Societies, with Benjamin Lee.

Reviews


"This book will be useful to those interested in penetrating the physical existence of dance to investigate its significance as a human practice that is political by its very nature." --E. McPherson, Montclair State University, Choice