Overbooked: The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism

Available

Product Details

Price
$20.00  $18.40
Publisher
Simon & Schuster
Publish Date
Pages
464
Dimensions
5.6 X 8.4 X 1.2 inches | 1.0 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781439161005

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About the Author

Elizabeth Becker is an award-winning author and former correspondent for The New York Times who reported from Europe, Asia, and South America. As the Senior Foreign Editor at National Public Radio, she oversaw all the network's foreign bureaus and their reporting. She has won awards from the Robert Kennedy Book Awards, Overseas Press Club, and DuPont-Columbia and was part of the New York Times staff that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for public service.

Reviews

"Required reading for anyone interested in the future of travel."--Arthur Frommer
"Travel is a huge global industry, rivaling oil and finance in economic value. Now, a terrific reporter gives us a full picture of its dimensions and its future. Elizabeth Becker does so, not by loading us down with statistics but by taking us around the world to match up the daunting numbers with places, adventures, and even pitfalls that will keep you reading."--Steven Brill, author of Class Warfare
"Tourism is one of the world's largest - and unexamined - industries. Elizabeth Becker takes us on a compelling journey across continents to show us just how essential tourism is to global prosperity. You will never book a room, ascend the Eiffel Tower, or see the sites in quite the same way again."--Zachary Karabell, author of Superfusion
"Follow Elizabeth Becker on this trip around the world and become a more mindful traveler. She is not only an intrepid globetrotter, but a terrific reporter who asks all the right questions!"--Sylvia Nasar, author of Grand Pursuit and A Beautiful Mind
"[A] meticulously reported and often disturbing exposé of the travel industry."--The New York Times Book Review
"The definitive account of the rise of the modern tourism industry, from its beginnings as a small, fanciful pastime among elites, to its explosive growth after World War II, to its present as an economic engine valued at $7 trillion."--Bloomberg BusinessWeek
"Elizabeth Becker has found a giant gap in journalistic coverage and stepped squarely into the middle of it. Even though it's under our noses, beneath our feet, even in our happier dreams, rarely has the investigative story she recounts in her new book previously received the coverage it deserves: The rampant growth of travel and tourism."--National Geographic
"Ms. Becker is a skilled, critical writer delivering illuminating information, telling engaging stories, and advancing her own personal observations. Overbooked appeals to a wide audience: those who make the billion trips annually; those who have a stake in the places impacted, sometimes for better, but all too often for worse, by those travelers' visits; and all who have a stake in the global economy."--New York Journal of Books
"In the tourism industry, image is definitely everything, but Becker shows readers the flip side of all this luxury and play, exposing the seedy underbelly of a business gone haywire from Cambodia to the United States."--Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review
"A comprehensive, often alarming, and sometimes puzzling examination of an oft-invisible powerhouse. . . . Overbooked succeeds in demonstrating the growing heft of the travel industry and the numerous problems that are associated with it."--The Weekly Standard
"Journalist Becker travels widely, experiencing and analyzing 'the stealth industry of the twenty-first century.' . . . Impressively wide-ranging . . . intriguing and eye-opening, this book will leave few in doubt that tourism deserves more consideration than it has hitherto received in larger discussions of globalization and public policy."--Publishers Weekly
"Will tourism in America go the way of Venice and Cambodia, or France and Costa Rica? Elizabeth Becker's thoughtful, informed book should move that discussion along."--Seattle Times