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Product Details

Price
$12.95  $11.91
Publisher
Galaxy Audio
Publish Date
Dimensions
5.46 X 5.7 X 0.6 inches | 0.28 pounds
Language
English
Type
Compact Disc
EAN/UPC
9781592122332

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About the Author

As one of the 20 top bestselling authors of all time, with more than 325 million works in circulation, L. Ron Hubbard stands alongside an illustrious company of writers. But he also stands alone--as an author who actually lived many of the stories he wrote.

Reviews

"A master of adventure."
--Anne McCaffrey

." . . the adventure ones are just so much fun, that you wish
there were more things written like them."
--Kevin J. Anderson
"Hubbard's tale, originally published in a pulp magazine in 1937, takes listeners to the war-torn Chinese city of Shunkien, where the Japanese have launched an assault of epic proportions. The lone building left standing among the piles of flaming rubble is the American consulate, where innocent refugees are trying to stave off hunger and a deadly flu epidemic. Demonstrating his unique ability to relate even the most complicated story with a keen eye for detail and realism, Hubbard's stunning writing ability and creative imagination set him apart as one of the greatest literary figures of the 20th century. The recording, as usual, is stunning and well directed by Jim Meskimen. Featuring brilliant performances by Brooke Bloom, R.F. Daley and Meskimen himself, the story captivates thoroughly." --Publishers Weekly starred review
"Hubbard's dialogue uses the lingo of the time, and the production includes background sounds and music from the period. All the narrators do a good job keeping listeners engaged." --AudioFile Magazine
"Originally published in 1937, this tale is a splendid audio, filled with sound effects, Asian-inspired music, and lively characterizations. The American consulate in a Japanese-occupied city in China is in dire need of cholera serum and food. U.S. Marine Gunnery Sergeant James Mitchell and Private First Class Spivits are trying to reach the consulate with serum and enough gold to purchase food. Along the way, they pick up Bronx-born fan dancer Goldy and Mitchell s missionary father. Bloom reads the role of Goldy in an authentic Bronx accent. When Goldy initially tries to pass herself off as the daughter of a millionaire, listeners know she is lying because her dialect gives her away. Remaining cast members do their part as well, bringing authenticity to the dialogue. Background sound effects place listeners in the action, and brackets of music create an old-time radio atmosphere. Give this to patrons (mostly males) looking for a short adventure story set against the backdrop of war." Booklist
"
"Hubbard s dialogue uses the lingo of the time, and the production includes background sounds and music from the period. All the narrators do a good job keeping listeners engaged." AudioFile Magazine"
"Hubbard s tale, originally published in a pulp magazine in 1937, takes listeners to the war-torn Chinese city of Shunkien, where the Japanese have launched an assault of epic proportions. The lone building left standing among the piles of flaming rubble is the American consulate, where innocent refugees are trying to stave off hunger and a deadly flu epidemic. Demonstrating his unique ability to relate even the most complicated story with a keen eye for detail and realism, Hubbard s stunning writing ability and creative imagination set him apart as one of the greatest literary figures of the 20th century. The recording, as usual, is stunning and well directed by Jim Meskimen. Featuring brilliant performances by Brooke Bloom, R.F. Daley and Meskimen himself, the story captivates thoroughly." Publishers Weekly starred review "
"Originally published in 1937, this tale is a splendid audio, filled with sound effects, Asian-inspired music, and lively characterizations. The American consulate in a Japanese-occupied city in China is in dire need of cholera serum and food. U.S. Marine Gunnery Sergeant James Mitchell and Private First Class Spivits are trying to reach the consulate with serum and enough gold to purchase food. Along the way, they pick up Bronx-born fan dancer Goldy and Mitchell's missionary father. Bloom reads the role of Goldy in an authentic Bronx accent. When Goldy initially tries to pass herself off as the daughter of a millionaire, listeners know she is lying because her dialect gives her away. Remaining cast members do their part as well, bringing authenticity to the dialogue. Background sound effects place listeners in the action, and brackets of music create an old-time radio atmosphere. Give this to patrons (mostly males) looking for a short adventure story set against the backdrop of war." --Booklist

"Hubbard's dialogue uses the lingo of the time, and the production includes background sounds and music from the period. All the narrators do a good job keeping listeners engaged." --AudioFile Magazine
"Hubbard's tale, originally published in a pulp magazine in 1937, takes listeners to the war-torn Chinese city of Shunkien, where the Japanese have launched an assault of epic proportions. The lone building left standing among the piles of flaming rubble is the American consulate, where innocent refugees are trying to stave off hunger and a deadly flu epidemic. Demonstrating his unique ability to relate even the most complicated story with a keen eye for detail and realism, Hubbard's stunning writing ability and creative imagination set him apart as one of the greatest literary figures of the 20th century. The recording, as usual, is stunning and well directed by Jim Meskimen. Featuring brilliant performances by Brooke Bloom, R.F. Daley and Meskimen himself, the story captivates thoroughly." --Publishers Weekly starred review
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