One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand

Available

Product Details

Price
$18.00
Publisher
Spurl Editions
Publish Date
Pages
218
Dimensions
5.1 X 7.4 X 0.5 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781943679072
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Luigi Pirandello (1867-1936) was an Italian novelist, short- story writer, and playwright. His best-known works include the novel 'The Late Mattia Pascal', in which the narrator one day discovers that he has been declared dead, as well as the groundbreaking plays Six Characters in Search of an Author and Henry IV, which prefigured the Theater of the Absurd. In 1926, Pirandello published 'One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand', which he had been writing for the previous seventeen years. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1934. William Weaver (1923-2013) was a renowned translator who brought some of the most interesting Italian works into English. He translated Italo Calvino, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Italo Svevo, Umberto Eco, Alberto Moravia, and Elsa Morante, to name just a few, as well as Pirandello's The Late Mattia Pascal. An expert on opera, Weaver lived for many years in a farmhouse in Tuscany and later became a professor of literature at Bard College.
William Weaver (1923-2013) was a renowned translator who brought some of the most interesting Italian works into English. He translated Italo Calvino, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Italo Svevo, Umberto Eco, Alberto Moravia, and Elsa Morante, to name just a few, as well as Pirandello's The Late Mattia Pascal. An expert on opera, Weaver lived for many years in a farmhouse in Tuscany and later became a professor of literature at Bard College.

Reviews

"Pirandello's novel is philosophical and metaphysical, a close examination of the fundamental question of how we and others see (and delude) ourselves about ourselves (and others) ... A playful, meditative novel, enjoyably seeing its narrator consumed by his obsession."--M.A. Orthofer, The Complete Review