Oh, Baby: True Stories about Conception, Adoption, Surrogacy, Pregnancy, Labor, and Love

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Product Details

Price
$15.95  $14.67
Publisher
In Fact Books
Publish Date
Pages
287
Dimensions
5.4 X 0.9 X 8.4 inches | 0.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781937163211

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About the Author

Lee Gutkind is the founder and editor of the literary magazine Creative Nonfiction and the author or editor of more than 30 books. He has written or edited numerous books about writing, including The Art of Creative Nonfiction, Keep It Real, and You Can't Make This Stuff Up: The Complete Guide to Writing Creative Nonfiction from Memoir to Literary Journalism and Everything in Between. He is also the editor or co-editor of numerous anthologies, including At the End of Life; Southern Sin: True Stories of the Sultry South and Women Behaving Badly; and True Stories, Well Told . . . from the First Twenty Years of Creative Nonfiction Magazine. Gutkind currently teaches creative writing at Arizona State University's Consortium for Science, Policy, and Outcomes.

Alice Bradley is a writer and editor who co-authored the book Let's Panic About Babies! (St. Martin's Press, 2011). She has been published in numerous magazines, including Real Simple, Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, Parents, and Redbook. Her short fiction and essays have appeared in Berkeley Fiction Review, Fence, [PANK], and The Sun. She has been nominated twice for a Pushcart Prize, in fiction and nonfiction. Her essays have also appeared in anthologies such as Sleep is for the Weak and Things I Learned About My Dad (in Therapy). Her popular blog Finslippy has maintained a steady following since its creation in 2004. She has a Twitter following of over 60,000.

Reviews


From the Publisher's Weekly review
"In her introduction, Lisa Belkin ("Life s Work: Confessions of an Unbalanced Mom") reflects on the shift from the time when she was a new parent ( parenting was still a silo ) to now, when multiple venues exist for discussion of every conceivable parenting-related topic. This book s contribution to the genre is a thoughtful, often funny set of 23 essays. Adoptions are the subject of some of the most poignant entries, including Mary A. Scherf s Becoming His Mother, about spending several days in a women s prison in Guatemala on kidnapping charges, and Nancy McCabe s The Baby Room, about accompanying her teenage daughter on a visit to the Korean orphanage where the latter was raised. There, the babies lie listless and unblinking in the airless room and no one launches a full-voiced, full-bellied cry. Crying, however, figures as a very real horror in other essays, such as Amy Penne s appropriately titled Apocalypse Now. Most contributors are women, but a few fathers also list their woes. In Four Early Lessons in Parenting, Steven Church laments his shortcomings in living up to the potential superhero his son thinks he is: My shoulder is wrecked. I m lactose intolerant. This collection s wide range of topics should resonate with an equally wide range of parents.""

From the Publisher's Weekly review

"In her introduction, Lisa Belkin (Life's Work: Confessions of an Unbalanced Mom) reflects on the shift from the time when she was a new parent ("parenting was still a silo") to now, when multiple venues exist for discussion of every conceivable parenting-related topic. This book's contribution to the genre is a thoughtful, often funny set of 23 essays. Adoptions are the subject of some of the most poignant entries, including Mary A. Scherf's "Becoming His Mother," about spending several days in a women's prison in Guatemala on kidnapping charges, and Nancy McCabe's "The Baby Room," about accompanying her teenage daughter on a visit to the Korean orphanage where the latter was raised. There, the babies "lie listless and unblinking in the airless room" and "no one launches a full-voiced, full-bellied cry." Crying, however, figures as a very real horror in other essays, such as Amy Penne's appropriately titled "Apocalypse Now." Most contributors are women, but a few fathers also list their woes. In "Four Early Lessons in Parenting," Steven Church laments his shortcomings in living up to the "potential superhero" his son thinks he is: "My shoulder is wrecked. I'm lactose intolerant." This collection's wide range of topics should resonate with an equally wide range of parents."