No One

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Product Details

Price
$12.95
Publisher
Tin House Books
Publish Date
Pages
170
Dimensions
5.05 X 0.47 X 7.7 inches | 0.28 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781935639220
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About the Author

GwenaAlle Aubry est une romanciA]re et philosophe franAaise nA(c)e le 2 avril 1971. Ancienne A(c)lA]ve de l'A0/00cole normale supA(c)rieure de la rue d'Ulm et du Trinity College de Cambridge, GwenaAlle Aubry est agrA(c)gA(c)e et docteur en philosophie1; elle a A(c)tA(c) l'A(c)lA]ve de Pierre Hadot. MaA(R)tre de confA(c)rences (philosophie ancienne et gA(c)nA(c)rale) A l'universitA(c) Nancy-II de 1999 A 2002, chargA(c)e de recherche au CNRS depuis 2002, elle est aussi membre associA(c) du Centre International d'A0/00tude de la Philosophie FranAaise Contemporaine (ENS-Ulm), dans le cadre duquel elle co-anime, avec Saverio Ansaldi et Didier Debaise, le sA(c)minaire AActualitA(c)s de la puissanceA. Elle est la sA-ur de la journaliste A0/00milie Aubry de La ChaA(R)ne parlementaire et d'Arte, et l'A(c)pouse du philosophe Quentin Meillassoux.
Trista Selous lives in London, where she works as a translator and teacher of French. She has published many translations and is the author of a book on the novels of Marguerite Duras.
Rick Moody is the author of the award-winning memoir The Black Veil, the novels Hotels of North America, The Four Fingers of Death, The Diviners, Purple America, The Ice Storm, Garden State, and multiple collections of short fiction. Moody is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and his work has been anthologized in Best American Stories, Best American Essays, and the Pushcart Prize anthology. He lives in Rhode Island.

Reviews


"Madness may, as Gwenaelle Aubry writes, 'name nothing, in reality, ' but her Personne definitively conjures its something--makes it tenderly felt in all its mystery, horror, and sorrow. Standing between the hard reckoning of autobiography and that which implores, melancholically, 'to be novelized, ' Personne pushes softly at the limits of what life-writing can be. It is a work of remarkable understatement and earned majesty, both."
--Maggie Nelson, author of "Bluets" and The Art of Cruelty"
"Gwenaelle Aubry's "Personne" is a beautifully rendered and conceived
work. Structured like a duet, with writing by her dead father and
herself, "Personne" is about the search for a wanderer father in the
morass of his unstable identity. It is an impassioned novel, a
psychoanalytic double session, an examination of the limits of
language, and an act of filial devotion."
--Lynne Tillman, author of "Someday This Will Be Funny"

"The words are simple yet offe
"Aubry's lucid prose has ascended to the heights of poetry."
--"Publishers Weekly"
"Madness may, as Gwenaelle Aubry writes, 'name nothing, in reality, ' but her Personne definitively conjures its something--makes it tenderly felt in all its mystery, horror, and sorrow. Standing between the hard reckoning of autobiography and that which implores, melancholically, 'to be novelized, ' Personne pushes softly at the limits of what life-writing can be. It is a work of remarkable understatement and earned majesty, both."
--Maggie Nelson, author of "Bluets" and The Art of Cruelty"
"Gwenaelle Aubry's "Personne" is a beautifully rendered and conceived
work. Structured like a duet, with writing by her dead father and
herself, "Personne" is about the search for a wanderer father in the
morass of his unstable identity. It is an impassioned novel, a
psychoanalytic double session, an examination of the limits of
language, and an act of filial devotion."
--Lynne Tillman, author of "Someday This Will Be Funny"

"The words are simple yet offer tremendous power. The fact is: we want to dog ear every page to relive certain moments, those certain expressions that put our hair on end..."
--"Le Figaro Litteraire"
"A testimony bereft of pathos...["No One"] achieves a double portrait: that of a fragmented man searching desperately for unity through writing, and that of a daughter who will succeed where her father failed by making him a novel's hero..."
-- "Magazine Litteraire"
"A cubist and polyphonic portrait, ridden with elegance and restraint, ["No One"] is a two-fold autobiography of a father and daughter, its threads are delicately woven with impressions, memories and language that recreate the figure of complex and engaging man, stranger to the world- yet, also stranger to himself..."
--"Le Monde des Livres"
"Her (Gwenaelle Aubry's) words, persistent and fixed in the glance of she who cannot save him, resem
"Aubry's sense of the human condition is both startling in its originality and sharp in its beauty: the reader might find himself reading a book that is in fact reading him back, in that what we learn...may apply to everyone searching for their authentic self."
--Leia Menlove, "Foreword Reviews"
"Aubry's lucid prose has ascended to the heights of poetry."
--"Publishers Weekly"
"Madness may, as Gwenaelle Aubry writes, 'name nothing, in reality, ' but her Personne definitively conjures its something--makes it tenderly felt in all its mystery, horror, and sorrow. Standing between the hard reckoning of autobiography and that which implores, melancholically, 'to be novelized, ' Personne pushes softly at the limits of what life-writing can be. It is a work of remarkable understatement and earned majesty, both."
--Maggie Nelson, author of "Bluets" and The Art of Cruelty"
"Gwenaelle Aubry's "Personne" is a beautifully rendered and conceived
work. Structured like a duet, with writing by her dead father and
herself, "Personne" is about the search for a wanderer father in the
morass of his unstable identity. It is an impassioned novel, a
psychoanalytic double session, an examination of the limits of
language, and an act of filial devotion."
--Lynne Tillman, author of "Someday This Will Be Funny"

"The words are simple yet offer tremendous power. The fact is: we want to dog ear every page to relive certain moments, those certain expressions that put our hair on end..."
--"Le Figaro Litteraire"
"A testimony bereft of pathos...["No One"] achieves a double portrait: that of a fragmented man searching desperately for unity through writing, and that of a daughter who will succeed where her father failed by making him a novel's hero..."
-- "Magazine Litteraire"
"A cubist and polyphonic portrait, ridden with elegance and restraint, ["No One"] is a two-fold autobiography of a father and daughter, its threads
"The question of identity haunts Aubry's slim, tough novel about a Parisian lawyer suffering from bipolar disorder...virtuosic sentences and ingenious structure...the reader feels privileged to gain access to these troubled minds."
"New York Times Book Review"
"Aubry's sense of the human condition is both startling in its originality and sharp in its beauty: the reader might find himself reading a book that is in fact reading him back, in that what we learn...may apply to everyone searching for their authentic self."
Leia Menlove, "Foreword Reviews"
"Aubry s lucid prose has ascended to the heights of poetry."
"Publishers Weekly"
Madness may, as Gwenaelle Aubry writes, name nothing, in reality, but her Personne definitively conjures its somethingmakes it tenderly felt in all its mystery, horror, and sorrow. Standing between the hard reckoning of autobiography and that which implores, melancholically, to be novelized, Personne pushes softly at the limits of what life-writing can be. It is a work of remarkable understatement and earned majesty, both.
Maggie Nelson, author of "Bluets" and The Art of Cruelty"
Gwenaelle Aubry s "Personne" is a beautifully rendered and conceived
work. Structured like a duet, with writing by her dead father and
herself, "Personne" is about the search for a wanderer father in the
morass of his unstable identity. It is an impassioned novel, a
psychoanalytic double session, an examination of the limits of
language, and an act of filial devotion.
--Lynne Tillman, author of "Someday This Will Be Funny"

The words are simple yet offer tremendous power. The fact is: we want to dog ear every page to relive certain moments, those certain expressions that put our hair on end
"Le Figaro Litteraire"
"A testimony bereft of pathos["No One"] achieves a double portrait: that of a fragmented man searching desperately for unity through writing, and that of a daughter who will succeed where her father failed by making him a novel s hero
"Magazine Litteraire"
"A cubist and polyphonic portrait, ridden with elegance and restraint, ["No One"] is a two-fold autobiography of a father and daughter, its threads are delicately woven with impressions, memories and language that recreate the figure of complex and engaging man, stranger to the world- yet, also stranger to himself
"Le Monde des Livres"
"Her (Gwenaelle Aubry s) words, persistent and fixed in the glance of she who cannot save him, resemble a string of melancholy diamondsmay she be reassured: with this powerful book, she pays her debt of love in full
"Le Point"
Page after page, with meticulousness and infinite tenderness, [Aubry] probes the biography, perspective, staggering failures, and the terrors of this man.
"Telerama"
[Aubry's] admirable book, woven with uncertainty, is altogether an intimate investigation, a declaration of love, homage, and tomb.
"Telerama"
"