Nightfall

Isaac Asimov (Author) Robert Silverberg (Author)
Backorder (temporarily out of stock)

Product Details

Publisher
Spectra Books
Pages
352
Dimensions
4.1 X 1.1 X 6.9 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Mass Market Paperbound
EAN/UPC
9780553290998
BISAC Categories:

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

To list Isaac Asimov's honors, as to list his books, would be excessive. Let it simply be noted that Isaac Asimov was the most famous, most honored, most widely read, and most beloved science fiction author of all time. In his five decades as an author, he wrote more than four hundred books, won every award his readers and colleagues could contrive to give him, and provided pleasure and insight to millions. He died in 1992, still at work.
Robert Silverberg (born January 15, 1935) is an American author and editor, best known for writing science fiction. He is a multiple winner of both Hugo and Nebula Awards, a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame, and a Grand Master of SF. He has attended every Hugo Awards ceremony since the inaugural event in 1953. In the mid-1960s, science fiction writers were becoming more literarily ambitious. Frederik Pohl, then editing three science fiction magazines, offered Silverberg carte blanche in writing for them. Thus inspired, Silverberg returned to the field that gave him his start, paying far more attention to depth of character development and social background than he had in the past and mixing in elements of the modernist literature he had studied at Columbia. Silverberg continued to write rapidly-Algis Budrys reported in 1965 that he wrote and sold at least 50,000 words weekly - but the novels he wrote in this period are considered superior to his earlier work; Budrys in 1968 wrote of his surprise that Silverberg is now writing deeply detailed, highly educated, beautifully figured books like Thorns and The Masks of Time. Perhaps the first book to indicate the new Silverberg was To Open the Sky, a fixup of stories published by Pohl in Galaxy Magazine, in which a new religion helps people reach the stars. That was followed by Downward to the Earth, a story containing echoes of material from Joseph Conrad's work, in which the human former administrator of an alien world returns after the planet's inhabitants have been set free. Other acclaimed works of that time include To Live Again, in which the memories and personalities of the deceased can be transferred to other people; The World Inside, a look at an overpopulated future; and Dying Inside, a tale of a telepath losing his powers. In the August 1967 issue of Galaxy, Pohl published a 20,000-word novelette called Hawksbill Station. This story earned Silverberg his first Hugo and Nebula story award nominations.