Never Smile at a Monkey: And 17 Other Important Things to Remember

Steve Jenkins (Author)
Available

Description

When it comes to wild animals, everyone knows that there are certain things you just don't do. It's clearly a bad idea to tease a tiger, pull a python's tail, or bother a black widow spider. But do you know how dangerous it can be to pet a platypus, collect a cone shell, or touch a tang fish? Some creatures have developed unusual ways of protecting themselves or catching prey, and this can make them unexpectedly hazardous to your health.

In this dynamic and fascinating picture book by Steve Jenkins, you'll find out what you should never do if you encounter one of these surprisingly dangerous animals.

Product Details

Price
$17.99
Publisher
Houghton Mifflin
Publish Date
October 01, 2009
Pages
32
Dimensions
10.31 X 0.45 X 10.39 inches | 0.95 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780618966202
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Steve Jenkins lives with his wife, Robin Page, and their three children in Colorado. He is the author and illustrator of many books for children.

Reviews

"A visually stunning book illustrated with cut paper and torn collages...This superlative illustrator has given children yet another work that educates and amazes."--School Library Journal, starred review

"With his trademark cut-paper technique, Jenkins proves there may not be a texture that he can't mimic on the page. The high-interest marriage of animals and danger, along with large, vibrant visuals, makes this a prime candidate for group sharing, and additional details and artwork at the end will flesh out some of the finer points for older children."--Booklist

"[Monkey] takes the cheesy appeal of the dangerous-animals hook and makes it thoughtful and inventive without robbing it of its melodramatic charm. . . Crisp and clean detail particularly distinguishes this batch of Jenkins' cut-out-collages, laid out with sharp edges against the white backgrounds, so the soft painterly striations and fibrous mottling stand out all the more."--Bulletin