My Private Property

Mary Ruefle (Author)
Backorder (temporarily out of stock)

Description

Author of Madness, Rack, and Honey ("One of the wisest books I've read in years," according to the New York Times) and Trances of the Blast, Mary Ruefle continues to be one of the most dazzling poets in America. My Private Property, comprised of short prose pieces, is a brilliant and charming display of her humor, deep imagination, mindfulness, and play in a finely crafted edition.

Personalia

When I was young, a fortune-teller told me that an old woman who wanted to die had accidentally become lodged in my body. Slowly, over time, and taking great care in following esoteric instructions, including lavender baths and the ritual burial of keys in the backyard, I rid myself of her presence. Now I am an old woman who wants to die and lodged inside me is a young woman dying to live; I work on her.

Mary Ruefle is the author of Trances of the Blast; Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures, a finalist for the 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism; and Selected Poems, winner of the William Carlos Williams Award. She has published ten other books of poetry, a book of prose (The Most of It), and a comic book, Go Home and Go to Bed!; she is also an erasure artist whose treatments of nineteenth-century texts have been exhibited in museums and galleries as well as published in the book A Little White Shadow. Ruefle is the recipient of numerous honors, including an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and a Whiting Award. She lives in Bennington, Vermont and teaches in the MFA program at Vermont College.


Product Details

Price
$25.00  $22.50
Publisher
Wave Books
Publish Date
October 04, 2016
Pages
128
Dimensions
5.5 X 0.7 X 8.0 inches | 0.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781940696386
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Mary Ruefle is the author of "Trances of the Blast" (Wave Books, 2013), "Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures," a finalist for the 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism (Wave Books, 2012), and "Selected Poems" (Wave Books, 2010), winner of the William Carlos Williams Award. She has published ten other books of poetry, a book of prose ("The Most of It," Wave Books, 2008), and a comic book, "Go Home and Go to Bed!," (Pilot Books/Orange Table Comics, 2007); she is also an erasure artist, whose treatments of nineteenth century texts have been exhibited in museums and galleries, and include the publication of "A Little White Shadow" (Wave Books, 2006). Ruefle is the recipient of numerous honors, including an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Guggenheim fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and a Whiting Award. She lives in Bennington, Vermont, and teaches in the MFA program at Vermont College.

Reviews

"What a civil, undomesticable, and heartening poet is Mary Ruefle: fond of experiment, but just as pleased to write of tilapia or county fairs; always novel, but never pandering to a mode; refusing neither the absurd nor the sublime. Any Ruefle poem is an occasion of resonant wit and language, subject to an exacting intelligence."
Rodney Jones, Poetry Society of America
"We emerge from these poems, scathed and awakened."
Christina Davis, Poetry
"No writer I know of comes close to even trying to articulate the weird magic of poetry as Ruefle does."
Weston Cutter, The Kenyon Review
"Ruefle is clearly one of the best American poets writing, and her body of work is remarkable for its spiritual force, intelligence, stylistic virtuosity, and adventurousness."
Tony Hoagland, On the Seawall
"[She is] a poet of visionary imagination, abiding sensitivity, and melancholy humor."
Publishers Weekly
"Ruefle is the Poet Laureate of the City of Ideassurreal and lyrical and deeply moving at the same time."
Michael Klein, Los Angeles Review of Books"
Mary Ruefle's My Private Property is a book that, if not read carefully and to its very last words, almost invites the reader to underestimate it. . . . In her recent work, Ruefle can seem like a supernally well-read person who has grown bored with what smartness looks like, and has grown attracted to the other side. Some of her narrators here come across as inconsistent, unsure and even inarticulate, which is not the same as dumb. She is not writing with a prescription, or at least not one for this earth. Nor is she celebrating the commonplace. She is concentrating on one thing at a time and doing something that, depending on how the light strikes it, can look like weirding out or being very serious.
--New York Times

The writing recalls fables, in that contained narratives and simple premises turn to reveal something of the human predicament. But far from offering moral instruction, Ruefle tunes into an unsettling and enlivening strangeness. . . . Playing through distinct notes of knowing and unknowing, Ruefle's writing strikes a chord that resonates in psychic and social realms.
--Publishers Weekly

The property that Ruefle deems private is the impalpable nature of the inner life we all share; it is at once ours and everyone's...Ruefle has shown a talent for elevating her acute observations and narrative inclination well above mere anecdote to create quietly disquieting moments--a literature of barbed ambiguity and unresolved disruption.
--Bookforum

Mary Ruefle is, in this humble bookseller's opinion, the best prose-writing poet in America. (And one of our best poets, too.) My Private Property, her latest collection of stories, essays, and asides, is as joyous and singular a book as you'll read.
--Literary Hub

In My Private Property, all of life can be mined for meaning--the pieces concern themselves with the small and the large without making value distinctions between the two. Ruefle deals as frequently with mundane matters--a Christmas tree, feeding a finch, crumbs on a kitchen counter--as with those capital-letter concepts: God, Love, Death, Time, Memory. Any of these "other things" can undergo some transubstantiation and become poetry.
--Los Angeles Review of Books

Reading her collection My Private Property, I'm struck by the conversational quality of this new work, by its anthropological spirit, and by its stubborn emphasis on the facts as Ruefle has found them.
--Paris Review

Mary Ruefle's careful, measured sentences sound as if they were written by a thousand-year-old person who is still genuinely curious about the world... [She] combine[s] imagistic techniques from surrealism with narrative techniques to create surprising, high-velocity, and deeply affecting work. This aesthetic has spawned many imitators and variations, but her style is unmistakable.
--The Stranger

I might say us dreamers have gotten ahold of the essay form. I might speak about how Mary Ruefle's prose explores the varied experience of singular feeling, feelings within feeling, braiding feelings, feeling slipping into other feelings, feelings inflecting feeling, feeling chasing feeling. [...] I might talk about how Mary Ruefle's prose makes you laugh aloud, and, in the same beat, breaks your heart.
--Essay Daily


Mary Ruefle's My Private Property is a book that, if not read carefully and to its very last words, almost invites the reader to underestimate it. . . . In her recent work, Ruefle can seem like a supernally well-read person who has grown bored with what smartness looks like, and has grown attracted to the other side. Some of her narrators here come across as inconsistent, unsure and even inarticulate, which is not the same as dumb. She is not writing with a prescription, or at least not one for this earth. Nor is she celebrating the commonplace. She is concentrating on one thing at a time and doing something that, depending on how the light strikes it, can look like weirding out or being very serious.
--New York Times

The writing recalls fables, in that contained narratives and simple premises turn to reveal something of the human predicament. But far from offering moral instruction, Ruefle tunes into an unsettling and enlivening strangeness. . . . Playing through distinct notes of knowing and unknowing, Ruefle's writing strikes a chord that resonates in psychic and social realms.
--Publishers Weekly

The property that Ruefle deems private is the impalpable nature of the inner life we all share; it is at once ours and everyone's...Ruefle has shown a talent for elevating her acute observations and narrative inclination well above mere anecdote to create quietly disquieting moments--a literature of barbed ambiguity and unresolved disruption.
--Bookforum

Mary Ruefle is, in this humble bookseller's opinion, the best prose-writing poet in America. (And one of our best poets, too.) My Private Property, her latest collection of stories, essays, and asides, is as joyous and singular a book as you'll read.
--Literary Hub

In My Private Property, all of life can be mined for meaning--the pieces concern themselves with the small and the large without making value distinctions between the two. Ruefle deals as frequently with mundane matters--a Christmas tree, feeding a finch, crumbs on a kitchen counter--as with those capital-letter concepts: God, Love, Death, Time, Memory. Any of these "other things" can undergo some transubstantiation and become poetry.
--Los Angeles Review of Books

Reading her collection My Private Property, I'm struck by the conversational quality of this new work, by its anthropological spirit, and by its stubborn emphasis on the facts as Ruefle has found them.
--Paris Review

Mary Ruefle's careful, measured sentences sound as if they were written by a thousand-year-old person who is still genuinely curious about the world... [She] combine[s] imagistic techniques from surrealism with narrative techniques to create surprising, high-velocity, and deeply affecting work. This aesthetic has spawned many imitators and variations, but her style is unmistakable.
--The Stranger

I might say us dreamers have gotten ahold of the essay form. I might speak about how Mary Ruefle's prose explores the varied experience of singular feeling, feelings within feeling, braiding feelings, feeling slipping into other feelings, feelings inflecting feeling, feeling chasing feeling. [...] I might talk about how Mary Ruefle's prose makes you laugh aloud, and, in the same beat, breaks your heart.
--Essay Daily