Mother of All Pigs

(Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$16.99  $15.63
Publisher
Unnamed Press
Publish Date
Dimensions
5.4 X 1.1 X 8.4 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781944700348
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Malu Halasa is a Jordanian Filipina American writer and editor based in London. Born in Oklahoma, she was raised in Ohio and is a graduate of Barnard College, Columbia University. Her books include: Syria Speaks - Art and Culture from the Frontline (2014); Transit Tehran: Young Iran and Its Inspirations (2009); The Secret Life of Syrian Lingerie: Intimacy and Design (2008); Kaveh Golestan: Recording the Truth in Iran (2007); Transit Beirut: New Writing and Images (2004) and Creating Spaces of Freedom: Culture in Defiance (2002). Mother of All Pigs is her first novel.

Reviews

Malu Halasa is one of the most original writers and editors covering the Middle East... witty, sumptuous, and genuinely revelatory." --The New Statesman
"Halasa's prose is revelatory. Wholly authentic and profoundly insightful, Mother of all Pigs is a captivating look at the lives of a Middle Eastern family." --Foreword Reviews, *Starred Review*
"Halasa's sharp critiques and deadpan humor make for a captivating exploration of the intricacies of the modern Middle East." --Publishers Weekly
"Halasa juggles multiple narrative threads in her lively debut... the story wins high marks for its affectionate and raucous portrayal of one Jordanian family in the midst of social and political upheaval." --Booklist
"'It has always been the same -- what men enjoy, women endure.' So says a character in this microcosmic portrait of the contemporary Middle East, where the generational shifts among the members of one Jordanian clan showcase a patriarchal order in slow-motion decline. Halasa's pungently witty novel contrasts the ways in which the women of the Sabas family embrace or push back against tradition." --The New York Times